Historic Chattahoochee Commission.
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Barbour County, Alabama»
1. Barbour County
 
Location: Located on Barbour County Courthouse lawn, Clayton, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 2, 1978
SIDE 1: 
On this site in 1833 was erected the first Barbour County Courthouse, a round log building 20 feet square. The first county seat was located at Louisville which had previously served as the county seat of Pike. This old Pike County Courthouse was temporarily used until the site was changed to Clayton. The first circuit court was held in Clayton on September 23, 1833. Barbour County was created by an act of the Legislature meeting in the state capitol of Tuscaloosa on December 18, 1832. It was one of the political subdivisions carved out of the land ceded by the Creek Indians under the Treaty of March 1832.

SIDE 2:  Early Barbour County Commissioners
Eleven Commissioners were appointed to select a centrally located site for a permanent seat-of-justice to be named Clayton, in honor of Augustin S. Clayton, a distinguished jurist of Georgia who represented his state in Congress from 1831-1835. The commissioners appointed by the Alabama Legislature were Jacob Utery, Daniel McKensey, William Cadenhead, James A. head, William Norton, William Bush, Green Beauchamp, Samuel G. B. Adams, Noah B. Cole, Robert Richards and T. W. Pugh.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

2. Barbour County High School
 
Location: Located in front of the school off Alabama Highway 10, Clio, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 1, 1979
Marker Text: 
Established under an Act of the Alabama Legislature in 1907, the school was built entirely by local initiative. It was completed in 1910 and occupied initially in September of that year. Consistently characterized by faculties of dedication and excellence, students were the recipients of vast educational advantages. From its hallowed halls have departed thousands of educated, disciplined students prepared for careers and all blessed by the institution. Last used as a school in 1961, the structure is now owned by the George C. Wallace Heritage Association and servers as a community center for the citizens of Clio.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the George C. Wallace Heritage Association, 1979.

3. Barbour County's "Little Scotland"
 
Location: Located on Highway 51 approximately 5 miles south of Louisville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 7, 1993
SIDE 1: 
In the 1820s before the Creek Indian Cession, Scot immigrants from Richmond County, North Carolina, settled this area of west Barbour County. Few other regions outside the motherland of Scotland have had a larger proportion of people bearing the names of the great Highland clans. Between 1823-1860 within a five mile radius of Pea River Church, Highlanders with the names of Baxter, Currie, McCall, McDonald, McEachern, McInnis, McKay, McKinnon, McLean, McLendon, McLeod, McNeal, and McRae lived. The families, serving the Lord, earned for the area the name "Little Scotland."

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Pea River Presbyterian Church, 1993.

SIDE 2:  Pea River Presbyterian Church
In 1823, immigrants from Richmond County, North Carolina, established the Pea River Presbyterian Church. Pea River was organized with fifteen members, eleven unnamed women and four men. The men were Gilbert McEachern, Daniel Currie, Alex McRae and Farquhuar McRae. Daniel Currie was chosen First Clerk of Session. Gilbert McEachern and Farquhuar McRae were chosen Ruling Elders. Pea River is the mother church to Clio, Louisville, and Union (Dale County) Presbyterian Churches.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Pea River Presbyterian Church, 1993.

4. Bethel Primitive Baptist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 29, 1989
Marker Text: 
Organized and constituted April 11, 1835. A committee called brethren John Tew and Solomon Sikes as presbyters. The presbyters, finding the brethren orthodox in faith, constituted a church which they named Bethel. Founders migrated from Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Georgia to the Blue Springs Community. The church was housed in a log or frame building, 1835-1962, which was bricked in 1962. The fellowship hall and baptistery were built in 1972. Some elders were: M. W. Helms; Aaron Helms, served 30-40 years; W. M. Baxley; L. H. Stucky; S. W. Etheridge; R. K. Blackshear; Thomas McGowan; C. L. Waldrop; F.A. Averette, Jr., served 10 years; George Vickers; Casey Houston and Fred Griffith.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, And Descendants of Elder Aaron Helms, 1989.

5. Blue Springs School 1920-1969
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 15, 1999
Marker Text: 
The Blue Springs School was first established in 1920. The land was donated by Henry H. Sheppard. The plans were drawn by the State School architect. The lumber was donated by citizens of the community and prepared at A. S. Knight's sawmill. Other financial needs were donated by local citizens, county board of education, and state aid for schoolhouse construction. Old Bethel, Anderson, and Old Blue Springs were consolidated to form the new school. The school was opened in 1921 for the first year of teaching in the consolidated building. In addition to academics, the students were taught high moral standards, honesty, love, respect for God, country, and each other. The first trustees were: Dr. J. D. McLaughlin, Chairman; N. B. Parmer; G. C. Reeder; and A. F. Scarborough.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Blue Springs School Alumni Association, 1999.

6. Creek Indian Removal
 
Location: Located at Old Creek Town Park, Lake Drive, Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 13, 1979
Marker Text: 
At the dawn of the recorded history of this land, the Creek Indians owned it. Before the men who built the great houses and the men who made the laws settled this area, the United States of America ceded this land to the Creek Indians for "as long as the grass grows or the water runs." Within four years, the Creeks were driven from this land by men who would profit by their expulsion. Before the Creeks were removed from this area, Chief Eufaula addressed the Alabama Legislature. These are some of the words that he spoke:

"I come here, brothers, to see the great house of Alabama, and the men who make the law, and to say farewell in brotherly kindness before I go to the far West, where my people are now going."

"In these lands of Alabama, which have belonged to my forefathers and where their bones lie buried, I see that the Indian fires are going out. Soon they will be cold."

"New fires are lighting in the West for us, they say, and we will go there. I do not believe our Great Father means to harm his red children, but that he wishes us well."

"We leave behind our good will to the people of Alabama who will build the great houses and to the men who make the laws. This is all I have to say."

May all who read this have within them, the charity that was within the heart of Chief Eufaula.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Eufaula Heritage Association, 1979.

7. Election Riot of 1874
 
Location: Located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 82 and Barbour County Road 49 near Comer, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 19, 1979
Marker Text: 
Near here is Old Spring Hill, the site of one of the polling places for the November 3, 1874 local, state and national elections. Elias M. Keils, scalawag and Judge of the City Court of Eufaula, was United States supervisor at the Spring Hill ballot box. William, his 16 year-old son, was with him. After the polls closed, a mob broke into the building, extinguished the lights, destroyed the poll box and began shooting. During the riot, Willie Keils was mortally wounded. The resulting Congressional investigation received national attention. This bloody episode marked the end of the Republican domination in Barbour County.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1979.

8. Eufaula First United Methodist Church
 
Location: Located at 101 East Barbour Street (U.S. Highway 82), Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1996
Marker Text: 
The origins of this church date back to 1834 when Methodists, under the leadership of Jesse Burch and others, met to worship and formed a Sunday School. A frame Greek Revival edifice, at the corner of Livingston and Barbour Streets, was completed in 1838 and used until 1873 when it was sold to the Jewish congregation. In 1875 a new brick house of worship was built at the corner of Eufaula and Barbour Streets. It was razed in 1914 and the existing Gothic Revival church building was completed in 1917. The adjacent administration building, formerly the parsonage, was constructed in 1881.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Eufaula First United Methodist Church, 1996.

9. First Baptist Church of Eufaula
 
Location: Located at 125 South Randolph Street, Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2001
Marker Text: 
Irwinton Baptist Church was constituted on June 24, 1837. The name of the town changed to Eufaula in 1843, and consequently the name of the church became Eufaula Baptist Church. The church assumed its third name in 1869 when it was changed to First Baptist Church of Eufaula. The church met temporarily in the male academy at the Northwest corner of Union and Livingston Streets. In 1841 a new church building was erected at the Northwest corner of Union and Forsyth Streets. The second church was built at this location and was dedicated on November 5, 1871. The building was destroyed by fire caused by lighting on August 12, 1907 and rebuilt using the same exterior walls without the steeple.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the First Baptist Church, 2001.

10. General Grierson's March
 
Location: Located in park median at the crest of the hill on West Broad Street, Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 15, 1978
Marker Text: 
This road marks the entrance into Eufaula of Federal troops on April 29, 1865. Lee had surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9. General Benjamin H. Grierson was advancing with four thousand cavalry from Mobile and was then about at Louisville. He had not heard of Lee's surrender. Masters Edward Young and Edward Stern, mounted on horses and bearing flags of truce, were at once dispatched out this road, the direct route from Clayton, to meet General Grierson. They met General Grierson at six-mile branch, delivered the message, and returned. Then Dr. C. J. Pope, Mayor, and a committee of City Councilmen rode out to meet the Federal General and cavalry, leading them back into town down Broad Street and across the Chattahoochee to camp at Harrison’s Mill near Georgetown, Georgia.

The town never surrendered. Though Eufaula remained under Federal military restriction about 4 to 5 months, good order prevailed and all private rights were respected.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

11. Grace Episcopal Church
 
Location: Located on North Midway Street in Clayton, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 18, 1997
Marker Text: 
This church had its origins in a mission station established by the Reverend J. L. Gay in 1844. On May 10, 1872 the mission was formally accepted in the Diocese of Alabama as Grace Church. Construction of a church building began in 1875 on a lot owned by General Henry Delamar Clayton and his wife Victoria. The Gothic Revival style building was completed on February 26, 1876 at which time the lot was deeded by the Claytons to the Protestant Episcopal Church of the State of Alabama. Bishop Richard J. Wilmer formally consecrated the church on November 14, 1876. The mission and church have been served by the Reverends Thomas J. Bland, DeBerniere Waddell, E. W. Spalding, as well as others.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Friends of Grace Episcopal Church, 1995.

12. Hart House
 
Location: Located in the median across the street from the Hart House, 211 North Eufaula, Avenue, Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 19, 1986
Marker Text: 
Built by John Hart about 1850, the Hart House is recognized as an outstanding example of pure Greek Revival architecture. Hart (c. 1805-1863) moved from New Hampshire and became a prominent merchant and farmer. When constructed, the house was on the western edge of the town. The Hart House was one of only five Eufaula buildings recorded by the Historic American Building Survey in 1935. It was entered on the National Register of Historic Places on December 12, 1973 as part of the Seth Lore Historic District. The building was purchased by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission for use as its headquarters on October 16, 1985.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1986.

13. Miller-Martin Townhouse
 
Location: Located on Louisville Avenue in Clayton, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1999
SIDE 1: 
John H. Miller built this Gothic Revival town house in 1859. He and his wife moved from Orangeburg, South Carolina to Barbour County in the early 1830's, settling in an area which would become known as the Tabernacle Community. He later purchased a tract of land in Clayton on which this house was constructed. It is noteworthy for the hand painted murals on the entrance hall ceiling which depict The Four Seasons as well as other designs on the parlor and dining room ceilings. This work has been attributed to an artist named Massillon. The townhouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in December 1974.

Erected by Charles and Wanda Sewell and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

SIDE 2:  Miller-Martin Townhouse
John Council Martin and Alice Floyd Martin purchased the home in 1915 and reared their four daughters, Mildred, Alice, Jonnie and Leila there. The property was inherited by daughter, Alice Martin Anderson in 1964. Her daughter, Ann Floyd Martin Miller, donated the property to the Clayton Historical Preservation Authority in 1983. In 1998, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sewell purchased and extensively renovated the townhouse.

Erected by Charles and Wanda Sewell and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

14. Octagon House
 
Location: Located at 103 North Midway Street in Clayton, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 2, 1991
Marker Text: 
This unusual house was built 1859-1861 by Benjamin Franklin Petty, a carriage and furniture merchant, who was a native of New York and a pioneer settler of Clayton. It was patterned after a design made popular by Orson S. Fowler's book "A Home For All, or the Gravel Wall and Octagon Mode of Building," which was published in New York in 1854. In April 1865, the house was used as staff headquarters for Union Cavalry Commander General Benjamin H. Grierson. Petty heirs sold the property to Judge and Mrs. Bob T. Roberts in 1901. In 1981, under the administration of Mayor Edward C. Ventress, the property was purchased from the estate of Mary Roberts Beatty Armistead by the Town of Clayton, which has overseen its renovation.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Clayton Historic Preservation Authority, 1991.

15. Old County Courthouse
 
Location: Located on Alabama Highway 51, Louisville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 19, 1978
Marker Text: 
Near this site stood the old Pike County Courthouse which was the county seat of Pike from 1822 to 1827. It also served as the temporary county seat of the newly created Barbour County in 1833-when Clayton was selected. Louisville was settled before 1822 by Daniel Lewis, for whom it is named. Two-fifths of the new county of Barbour, including Louisville, was taken from old Pike. The first road in this area led from Louisville to Williamston to Franklin on the Chattahoochee River.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

16. Old Negro Cemetery/Fairview Cemetery
 
Location: Located on the east side of North Randolph Avenue, Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 23, 1991
SIDE 1:  Old Negro Cemetery
Interred on this gently sloping hillside are the remains of many of Eufaula's early black citizens. Their names are known only to God because the wooden grave markers which located the burials have long since vanished. This burying ground was used until about 1870 when black interments were moved to Pine Grove Cemetery. In addition to the "Old Negro Cemetery", there are at least five other graveyards including the Jewish, Presbyterian, Masonic, Odd Fellows and Public which are part of present day Fairview Cemetery.

Erected by the City of Eufaula and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1991.

SIDE 2:  Fairview Cemetery
The earliest burials in this cemetery date from Eufaula's pioneer days in the late 1830’s and early 1840’s. Formerly known as the "Old Cemetery", this public burial ground has been expanded through land purchases and the consolidation of other cemeteries including the Jewish, Presbyterian, Masonic, Odd Fellows and Negro. At the suggestion of his daughter, Claude Hill, Mayor P. B. McKenzie named the cemetery “Fairview” about 1895. The iron fence which borders the property on North Randolph Avenue was salvaged from Union Female College.

Erected by the City of Eufaula and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1991.

17. Providence Methodist Church and Schoolhouse
 
Location: Located near the Batesville Community at US Highway 82 and County Road 79 in Barbour County, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  June 29, 1997
SIDE 1: 
In 1828, Reverend John Wesley Norton left his native South Carolina with his family and a wagon train of followers, crossed into the Creek Indian Nation and just into the edge of what was then Pike County, settling near the present town of Clayton, Alabama. He was then in the bounds of, or in proximity to, the Chattahoochee Circuit of the Methodist Episcopal Church and was quite an acquisition to the young and struggling circuit in that newly settled section on the borders of the Indian tribes.

SIDE 2:  Providence Methodist Church and Schoolhouse
In 1835, Reverend John Wesley Norton located near Batesville and established the Providence Methodist Church and School which thrived for many years until his death in 1862. Located four miles south, only the Providence Cemetery remains where Reverend Norton, his wife Nancy Phillips Norton, and many of his church members and neighbors rest in peace. He was a man of few tears, solid piety, true benevolence and spotless character. He was a real pioneer and his death inflicted an irreparable loss upon those he left behind.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Norton Family Association, 1997.

18. Spring Hill United Methodist Church
 
Location: Located on the south side of Barbour County Road 89 near the intersection of 89 and County Road 49 in the community of Spring Hill, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 21, 1997
Marker Text: 
This Greek Revival church was built in 1841 by John Fletcher Comer with lumber from his mill. The building originally had a slave balcony and exterior stairway which were removed c. 1890. At the same time, the pulpit was moved from between the two entrance doors to the rear of the church. There were 104 members in 1872 that included 32 men and 72 women. In 1899, a deed for twenty acres was issued by the Comer Family to the church. The property contained the church, cemetery and land for a school. Today the church and cemetery are maintained, in part, with monies from a trust established through Avondale Mills, the Comer family business.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Spring Hill United Methodist Church, 1997.

19. White Oak United Methodist Church
 
Location: Located on U. S. Highway 431 South, about 8 miles south of Eufaula, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1990
SIDE 1: 
First known as White Oak Chapel, this church was dedicated on October 16, 1859 by Reverend Isaac I. Tatum of the Alabama Conference Methodist Episcopal Church South. The Society was organized by Reverend John J. Cassady who served as pastor in 1860. A log schoolhouse, constructed prior to 1859, served as the church building. The church is situated on land donated by Ezekiel Alexander (1803-1879). The grave of his son Asa, who died in 1861, is the earliest marked burial in the cemetery. Within a few years the log church was replaced by one made of rough, undressed lumber. A more finished building was erected in 1888.

Erected by White Oak United Methodist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1990.

SIDE 2:  White Oak United Methodist Church
The present church building was constructed in 1952-1953 upon the foundation of the 1888 building. A fellowship hall including kitchen and Sunday School rooms were added as part of this building project. Dr. A. E. Schaefer was district superintendent and Reverend Ennis Sellers was pastor. The building committee was E. F. Calhoun, chairman, R. A. James, W. V. Powell, Mrs. J. W. Calhoun and Mrs. S. E. Godfrey, Jr. In 1953 the church was recognized by Emory University and the Sear-Roebuck Foundation as Alabama's "Rural Church of the Year" because of outstanding achievement during 1952-1953.

Erected by White Oak United Methodist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1990.

Chambers County, Alabama»
1. Bluffton-Lanett, Alabama
 
Location: Located in the Triangle Area, Lanett, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 9, 1980
SIDE 1: 
Known as Bluffton from about 1835-1893. Bluffton was incorporated in 1865. Name changed to Lanett, town of Lanett incorporated 1893. Its charter was approved in 1895. Early records mention academies, two near this site. The Presbyterian Church was organized in 1837 at the home of Thomas S. Reese. Bluffton tanyard produced leather for the Confederacy. Lanett Cotton Mills incorporated in 1892, Lanett Bleachery & Dye Works incorporated 1895, Subsidiaries, later Divisions of West Point Manufacturing Company. Lanett's early mayors were George Newton Croft, Sr., E. B. Reid, and James D. Norman.

SIDE 2: 
Forrest "Fob" James, who was elected Governor of the State of Alabama on November 7, 1978, was born in Lanett and resided here through young manhood, receiving his early education in this city's public school system.

In October 1798 Benjamin Hawkins journeyed through present Chambers County near the Chattahoochee. His path led across the present city of Lanett. Hawkins’ journal is a record of the first known journey through this area.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Chattahoochee Valley Historical Society, 1979.

2. Chambers County, Alabama: Fredonia
 
Location: Located at the Cross Roads, Fredonia, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 24, 1978
Marker Text:  Fredonia
From its foundation, Fredonia was the educational and trade center for northeast section of Chambers County. "The Southern Military Academy" was established in the village by the State Legislature and forced to close by the civil strife. Sixteen businesses existed, including a "jug" factory, hotels, taverns, blacksmith shop, tan yard, the "Temperance House," and the incorporated “Fredonia Trade House.” The first established Methodist Church in the county was the Fredonia Methodist Church. The town was incorporated September 29, 1853. Many direct descendants of early settlers still live in this area.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

3. Chambers County, Alabama;Providence Baptist Church
 
Location: Located at the Church on Chambers County Road 36, five miles west of downtown Lanett, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 8, 1979
SIDE 1:  Providence Baptist Church
Providence Baptist Church was organized before 1836 by Elder Francis Calloway. It was one on the ten charter churches of the East Liberty Baptist Association. The small white frame church was built during the ministry of Reverend George E. Brewer, who served Providence 1883-1889. It has served some of the best known families in all this section including the: Askews, Harringtons, Wolfes, Calloways, Barrows, Meadors, Slaughters, Shealeys, Wallaces, Lancasters, Burdetts, Meadows, and others.

SIDE 2: 
Providence has been served by many noted pastors: W. D. Harrington, 21 years; W. C. Bledsoe, W. E. Lloyd, George E. Brewer, C. J. Burden. A. S. Brannon, W. P. Cofield, J. P. Hunter, C. B. Martin, Earle Trent, Oley C. Kidd, Albert Strozier, Carl Burke, Ralph Williams, U. M. Starnes, Jimmy Auchmuty, J. H. Carroll, James Coleman, Robert Crowder. Several early members left Providence Church to go out and form other Baptist churches.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1979.

4. Fairfax First Christian Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 25, 1996
SIDE 1: 
Built 1916 by West Point Manufacturing Company and called Fairfax "Union" Church as it was shared by Disciples of Christ, Methodist, and Baptist groups. It was purchased by the Disciples of Christ after the others left to build their own churches and renamed Fairfax First Christian Church. White clapboard exterior built in shape of cross. Windows-hammered glass in shape of Moses' tablets. Original features in use: pews designed to match windows, windows, pulpit, exposed hand-hewn interior beams, interior design. Addition built in 1952. Designated a historic landmark by the Alabama Historical Commission in 1992 and the Valley City Council in 1993.

SIDE 2:  Fairfax First Christian Church
Founding ministers: Reverend S. P. Speigel, Pastor West Point Christian Church; Reverend Dan Joiner, Pastor Lanett Christian Church. Charter Members: Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Smith, Sr.; Mrs. R. V. Combs; Mr. Charlie Floyd; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Norred; Mrs. Donzell Norred; Mr. and Mrs. H. Pigg; Judge Marion Brown; Mr. Walter Williams; Mr. Watkins; and Mrs. Pearl Dunn. The church building is part of the original Fairfax mill village design which included worker houses, general store, school, water-sewage system, railroad passenger and freight service.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Fairfax First Christian Church, 1996.

5. Fairfax Kindergarten
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 30, 2003
Marker Text: 
Fairfax Kindergarten

Built in 1916, the kindergarten was one of five original public buildings in the Fairfax Mill Village. Each mill village had an efficient,attractive, and well kept kindergarten for children ages four to six. LaFayette Lanier, Sr. was the inspiration for the kindergarten system that was put into operation. In his newsletter of July 16, 1917, William Teagin, Alabama Superintendent of Education,commended West Point Manufacturing Company for its commitment to education. The kindergarten was in operation until 1983and is now privately owned.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Charter Foundation 2003.

Located at 300 Boulevard, Valley, Alabama.

6. First Courts - Chambers County
 
Location: Located on the front lawn of the Chambers County Museum.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 6, 1978
Marker Text: 
About 150 yards north of this marker at Captain Baxter Taylor's home on the Chapman Trail, the first Commissioners’ Court in Chambers County, Alabama was held April 1833. At this same place, under the shade of a large oak tree, the first Circuit Court was held on April 20, 1833. Earlier in the spring of 1833, election of county officials was held at the home of James Taylor. Courthouse Commissioners elected were Honorable Thomas C. Russell, James Taylor, and Baxter Taylor.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

7. Fort Cusseta - Chambers County
 
Location: Located on Chambers County Road, 55, Cusseta, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 18, 1978
Marker Text: 
Following the signing of the Creek Treaty in 1832, the early white settlers constructed a 16 by 30 foot hand hewn log fort for protection against a possible Indian uprising from Cussetaw Indian Village on Osanippa Creek just north of here. Walls of the fort were 4 and 6 feet high, with portholes at height of 4 feet, still visible after 140 years. Last known fort of its kind in Southeast.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission 1978.

8. Hopewell Methodist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1993
SIDE 1: 
The origins of Hopewell M.E. Church date to religious meetings held by Reverend James M. Spear soon after coming to Chambers County in 1839. An 1841 Class Paper names 48 white and 6 black members. The oldest written record entitled "Hopewell M. E. Church" is dated April 1843. It lists 44 members and names trustees, James M. Spear, Hardy Hancock, Robert B. Everitt, Osborne Robinson and Micajah Wardlaw. A house of worship erected near the Spear home was destroyed in a storm shortly after Reverend Spear's death in November 1852. Both he and his wife, Margaret Everitt Spear are buried at this first location.

SIDE 2:  Hopewell Methodist Church
In 1853, James E. Chambers donated 3 acres of land on the Collins Ferry-Oakbowery Road for Hopewell Church and Cemetery. The first building here was crude with split log benches. It was replaced in the 1880's by one built by James B. Chambers & J. R. P. Chambers. It serves today as the sanctuary. Trustees in 1880 were John T. Holladay, Ivey Morris and William Barnes. Early preachers included: James H. Laney, W. P. Miller, John W. Laney, John Matthews, C.D. Oliver, S. H. Dimon, R. W. Anderson, F. P Culver, H. S. Hamilton, Z. A. Dowling, G. E. Driskill, R. M. Archibald, J C. Craig, C. W. Seale, H. M. Hurst, H. S. Mathews, V. W. Hamner, S. A. Swindell, W. T. Holderidge, W. M. Treadaway, J. H. Hearn, I. M. Sewell, J. O. Weathers.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Hopewell United Methodist Church, 150th Anniversary, 1993.

9. Lanier High School
 
Location: Located at L. B. Sykes Junior High School, 1302 Cherry Drive, Lanett, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 27, 2003
SIDE 1:  LANIER HIGH SCHOOL
The school was located at three different sites on Cherry Drive. Its beginning was in The Blue Hall Building adjacent to Goodsell Methodist Church. Later it was moved to the Dallas/Jackson Home and became the Jackson Hill School. In 1921, George H. Lanier provided funds to annex high school space. It became a part of Lanett City Schools, and the name changed to Lanier High. Lanier High was accredited in 1935 and six students constituted the first graduating class. The Darden family donated land and in 1937 a new school was built for grades 3-12 on the present site. Later, the Home Economics Building and Shop were added.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission And The Charter Foundation 2003

SIDE 2:  LANIER HIGH SCHOOL
Until 1959 Lanier High was the only school in The Greater Valley area that conferred highschool diplomas on Black students. Reuben Dallas, S.Q. Bryant and L.B. Sykes were the principals who served from the early 1920s-1969. System-wide restructuring resulted in Lanier High losing grades 7-12, and in 1970 it became L. B. Sykes Lanett Jr. High with grades 6, 7 & 8. L. B. Sykes was accredited in 1974-75. The Lanier High building was demolished during the Summer of 1991, leaving the Home Economics Building as the only remnant of the school.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission And The Charter Foundation 2003.

10. Oak Bowery
 
Location: Located near Oak Bowery United Methodist Church on U. S. Highway 431, Oak Bowery, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 6, 1978
Marker Text:  Settled 1828
Near this site stood the Oak Bowery Female Institute, opened in 1849 under auspices of the Methodist Church. Masons established the East Alabama Masonic Institute for young men. Among Oak Bowery's noteworthy citizens:

William J. Samford, Alabama Governor; James F. Dowdell, U. S. Congressman; James Render Dowdell, Chief Justice, Alabama Supreme Court; William H. Thomas, Alabama Supreme Court Justice; General Robert Lee Bullard, U. S. A.; Captain Leckinski Ware Spratling, Surgeon, U. S. N.; Dr. William Philip Spratling, founded Craig Colony for Epileptics; The Reverend Sam P. Jones, renowned Methodist Evangelist

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

11. Ward's Mill
 
Location: The Ward’s Mill marker has been stolen. The Sheriff’s Department is trying to locate the marker.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 25, 1985
SIDE 1: 
Where Oakfuskee Trail crosses Oseligee Creek: Nimrod Doyle, first white settler in present day Chambers County, built a trading post and grist mill here in 1816-1818. Doyle was in the Great Lakes Indian Wars under General St. Clair. He knew Indian leader Tucemseh at Detroit, and was the only white man Tecumseh would talk with at Tukabachi. Doyle was sub-agent under Indian agent Benjamin Hawkins. Nimrod Doyle married daughter of Coweta Indian Joseph Islands and fathered two sons and two daughters.

SIDE 2:  Ward's Mill
Children of Nimrod Doyle, first white settler of present day Chambers County: Daughter Muscogee Doyle's land from 1832 treaty became site of Fredonia. Amanda Doyle married James Callahan at Asbury Mission near Fort Mitchell in 1829. Callahan was last survivor of the Confederate Congress. Son Jackson married a Creek woman and owned Ward’s Mill site 1832. Son Winchester married a white woman. Doyle’s family went with Creek Indians to Oklahoma. Since then many whites have owned this place, including Revolutionary Veteran Stephen Nolen, and later, Solomon Ward.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, The Chambers County Commission, The Leonard B. Blanton Family 1985

Dale County, Alabama»
1. Merrick's Woodshop Ozark
 
Location: Located on Dale County Courthouse lawn, Ozark, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  June 24, 1979
SIDE 1: 
In the 1820's pioneers, including John Merrick, began settling in vicinity of present-day Ozark, first called "Merrick’s." Dale County formed December 22, 1824. In the 1830’s wooden stores and cotton gin were built about one mile north of present court house. In 1841 the west half of Dale County became Coffee County. First Post Office, June 7, 1843, called "Woodshop." In 1859 postmaster Elijah T. Matthews petitioned for the name "Ozark" after Indians who inhabited the mountains of Arkansas and Missouri.

SIDE 2:  Ozark - Fourth County Seat of Dale County
In 1868, southern one-third of Dale County became part of Geneva County. In 1869 courthouse in Newton burned; an election on January 17, 1870, selected Ozark as county seat. A "new Ozark" was surveyed on 70 acres centered on courthouse. The Southern Star and other businesses moved from Newton to Ozark in 1870. Courthouses on this site were built in 1870, 1885 (replacing one which burned in 1884), 1901, and present building, 1968.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dale County Historical Society, 1979.

2. Newton Town on the Hill - 1843
 
Location: Located on Alabama Highway 134, Newton, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 27, 1979
SIDE 1: 
Newton was hub of Dale County activities from 1843 until 1870. During War Between the States (1861-1865), Newton was center of recruiting, including the Home Guards. In March 1865, local militia repulsed attack by band of irregulars. Board of Physicians established 1856 to issue licenses. The Southern Star first published here in 1867. Newton was port for river boats (until railroad built in 1890), home of Killebrew's Mill, Kill Kare Kamp, Methodist Academy, and Baptist Collegiate Institute (operating 1898-1929).

SIDE 2:  Newton - Third County Seat of Dale County
In 1841, the west half of Dale County became Coffee County, thereby making the county seat at Daleville off-center. Five commissioners were appointed and they selected this site south of the Choctawhatchee River, which the legislature named "Newton" and designated the county seat on February 9, 1843. In this “new town” a wooden courthouse and a log jail were built. The courthouse burned March 22, 1869, and the county seat was changed to Ozark in 1870.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dale County Historical Society, 1979.

3. Ozark Baptist Church
 
Location: Located on the grounds of the church, 314 South Union Avenue, Ozark, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1998
SIDE 1: 
This church was organized August 23, 1848, under the leadership of Reverend U. H. Parker at the home of William Andrews, two miles east of Ozark, and was called Andrews Church. It was renamed Union Baptist Church in 1852 and Ozark Baptist Church in 1902. The original building was erected in 1852 on land donated by Moses Matthews, near the church's present site. In 1882 a larger facility was built and another in 1902 to meet the growing membership’s needs. The present sanctuary was constructed in 1955 and the multipurpose building in 1988. Two major mission efforts have been the sponsorship of Ridgecrest and Logan Baptist Churches in Ozark.

Erected by The Ozark Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1998.

SIDE 2:  Church Pastors
Served between 1848 and 1899: U. H. Parker, L. R. Sims, Daniel Cumby, T. S. Due, W. H. Howell, Caswell S. Smith, Zachariah Harris, Pitt M. Calloway, James M. Poyner, Ransom Deal, P. L. Moseley, H. C. Hurley, J. W. Dickerson, Ransom Deal. Served between 1900 to the present: J. J. Haygood, 1900-03; J. S. Yarborough, 1905-06; J. L. Thompson, 1907-08; J. M. Anderson, 1909-10; A. L. Blizzard, 1910-11; M. L. Harris, 1912-17; J. B. Lasseter, Jr., 1919-22; R. W. Langham, 1923-24; T. W. Talkington, 1924-27; H. O. Hughes, 1928-29; Noble Y. Beall, 1930-32; C. W. Milford, 1932-40; John B. Johnson, 1940-47; Charles H. Landers, 1948-56; L. Don Miley, 1957-70; Ronald J. Heddle, 1971-79; James C. Wayne, 1980-86; P. T. Bailey, 1987-90; John F. Lindsey, 1991-95; Gregory Aman, 1995 to present. Erected by The Ozark Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1998.

4. PENIEL BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Location: 2710 County Road 4, Skipperville, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  June 13, 2004
SIDE 1:  PENIEL BAPTIST CHURCH 1852-2004
Listed below are the known pastors of Peniel Baptist Church since its establishment about 1852. Middleton Brooks, S. Hargrove, W. A. Cumbie, Ransom C. Deal, Sr., R. Cass Deal, R. B. Arnold, J. W. Phillips, F. M. Shirah, M. A. Smith, A. J. Renfroe, A. M. Glover, B. J. Marshall, J. E. Plant, M. J. Walding, Charles C. Baker, Gary Carter, L. D. Woodham, Sr., Bobby Andrews, A. T. Arnold, W. A. Baker, John Payne, Bruce Cooper, John W. Helton, Jr., Ray Wren, and Timothy McCraney.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Peniel Baptist Church, June 13, 2004.

SIDE 2:  PENIEL BAPTIST CHURCH
On June 13, 1854, William A. Stanford deeded land to the Missionary Baptist Church at Peniel. The deed was granted to Starkey Stuckey, the deacon authorized to represent the church for this transaction. According to the originaldeed, a lightwood stake, near the graves,marked the eastern boundary of the property, consisting of one acre, and ninety-nine 23/25 hundredths of an acre. The first split-log church was torn down in 1876 and a second church was built at a cost of $50. A third church was built in 1901. M. J. Walding was the pastor when the present church was builtin 1954, using lumber and materials salvaged from the 1901 church building.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Peniel Baptist Church, June 13, 2004.

5. Pleasant Grove Primitive Baptist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2000
SIDE 1: 
Pleasant Grove Primitive Baptist Church, first called Zion Hill, was organized on August 28, 1841 on a site two miles east of here on land given by the Carroll Family. Most of the charter members were settlers from the Carolinas who brought their church letters with them. The Carroll Cemetery is still located at the old site. In 1878, James and Nancy Bottoms gave the land where the church now stands. During its existence, the church has been served by 20 pastors with Elder S. W. Etheredge serving the longest, 1929-1985. Services have been held continuously since its founding, excluding the Civil War years, 1861-1865. The church is a member of the Choctawhatchee Association.

Erected by the Pleasant Grove Primitive Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2000.

SIDE 2:  Elders of Pleasant Grove Primitive Baptist Church
C. Curry 1841-1845 Joel Pate 1846-1849 N. M. Pellum 1854-1854 (8 months) D. S. Hood 1855-1857 Jesse Tomlin 1867-1868, 1872-1873 C. S. Pellum 1873-1875 A. Pellum 1874-1875 J. W. Parker 1875-1897 Lee Hanks 1888-1894 J. E. W. Henderson 1898-1910 Jesse Brown 1910-1916 J. J. Byrd 1915 (6 months) W. J. Hull 1916-1918 J. J. Byrd 1918-1919 A. H. Henderson 1919-1920 W. J. Hull 1920-1921 J. J. Turnipseed 1921-1923 T. E. McGown 1923-1926 J. J. Turnipseed 1926-1929 S. W. Etheredge 1929-1985 Freddy A. Averett 1985-

Erected by the Pleasant Grove Primitive Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2000

6. Richmond - First County Seat - Henry County
 
Location: Located near Mount Pleasant Baptist Church on Alabama Highway 134, two miles northeast of Midland City, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 29, 1979
SIDE 1: 
Henry County was created December 13, 1819; David Caldwell first Probate Judge, held court in homes of early settlers. Richmond was selected in 1822 for first county seat. Creation of Dale County (in 1824, from western part of Henry County and other lands), resulted in removal of Henry County seat to Columbia. In 1826, Henry County was authorized to levy a tax to help pay Robert Irwin and Pelatiah Whitehurst for building a "courthouse and jail" at Richmond.

SIDE 2:  Richmond - First County Seat - Dale County
Dale County, created December 22, 1824, had Lewis Hutchinson appointed September 24, 1825, as first Probate Judge replacing Pelatiah Whitehurst who lived in Henry County. Richmond was annexed to Dale County in January, 1826, with Dale to share cost of "Courthouse and jail." Dale court was held in “Old Courthouse” at Richmond until new site selected. On January 12, 1830, records show, “The seat of justice of Dale County is hereby permanently established at Daleville.”

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dale County Historical Society, 1979.

7. Salem Baptist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 14, 1996
SIDE 1: 
This church was organized August 3, 1868, under a brush arbor, by Elias John McLendon and John Bradley. The first building was a log house near the cemetery west of the Edd Dykes's place. First known an "Antioch" the church was later named Salem. On September 6, 1871 one acre of land for the church was purchased and another two acres adjoining this property was donated by Reverend John Bradley, the first pastor. Construction on the present church was begun in 1903 and various modifications have been made over the years.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Salem Baptist Church, 1995.

SIDE 2:  Salem Baptist Church Pastors
John Bradley, Hargrove D. Cumbie, R. B. Arnold, J. E. Smoots, C. C. Kirkland, J. Alfred Phillips, J. W. Phillips, H. Gunter, R. C. Deal, R. W. Stuckey, J. E. Franks, J. R. Byrd, F. M. Shirah, Eddie Johnson, W. S. Dean, C. W. Stutts, W. C. Henson, A. B. Conant, J. B. Johnson, A. O. Martz, Kiedell Thomas, Harvey W. Beasley, William A. Baker, Bobby Andrews, Johnny B. Spurling, Clyde Hancock, Jim Mitchell and present pastor, Dean Gatch.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Salem Baptist Church, 1995.

8. The Block House 1814
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 231, four miles east of Newton, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1979
SIDE 1: 
The first public structure in what later became Dale County was erected one mile east of this marker at the confluence of the East and West Choctawhatchee Rivers. Called The Block House, it was built of logs by a contingent of Jackson's army in 1814. This post was not fortified; it provided shelter for militia and settlers driven into it by fear of the Indians. The site of a ferry across the River, it was occupied as a store and was designated a post office from 1833 to 1841; first postmaster was John Whitehurst.

SIDE 2:  River Port - Fort - Ferry
The Block House was the center of a settlement which included Thomas Obadiah Dick, ferry operator, and John Beverett, who purchased the site in 1836. In 1823 this area was surveyed by Robert D. Harris of the Sparta Land Office, headquarters of the Conecuh Land District. In 1824 Elisha Matthews taught school in the home of William Mills, for which he was paid $10.00 per month and board. In 1827 Seaborn Ledbetter, a local merchant, launched a "pole" boat named the “Choctawhatchee Hornet.” Nearby John Huccaby operated the first grist mill.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dale County Historical Society, 1979.

9. Union Presbyterian Church
 
Location: Located off Dale County Highway 15, in the Arguta Community, nine miles southeast of Ariton, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1978
SIDE 1: 
Organized by John Warnock, East Alabama Presbytery, September 1843, its mother church being Pea River Presbyterian (Barbour County). Founders, who migrated from Scotland to Argura, North Carolina, and then to Union (Dale County), 1820-1840's, called the community Arguta. The Church was housed in log or frame buildings 1859, 1886, 1909 (burned 1910), 1910-1915. A Fellowship Hall was added in 1977.

SIDE 2: 
Founders included George B. Keahey, Elijah Keahey, William Keahey, Neil Munn, Norman Cameron, John Keahey, James Keahey, Sr., Hugh McDonald, Archibald McEachern, Dougald McFadden, John Munn, Sr., Nancy Campbell, Margaret Keahey, Sarah Keahey (1), Sarah Keahey (2), Mary Keahey, Eliza Keahey, Martha Keahey, Margaret McDonald, Catherine McEachern, Mary McFadden, Eliza McGill, Mary Munn, Catherine Munn, Ann McFadden, Catherine McDonald. Early Pastors: Elon Martin, Duncan McCormick, Arthur Mooney, M. A. Patterson who served 15 years.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

10. Veterans Memorial Bridge - 1921
 
Location: Located on U. S. Highway 231 at Pea River Memorial Bridge, twelve miles northwest of downtown Ozark, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 11, 1979
SIDE 1: 
This reinforced concrete river bridge, thought to be the first in Alabama, was erected over Pea River in 1920-21 at a cost of $92, 108.97. It was dedicated on August 3, 1921, as a memorial to the 57 men from Dale County who lost their lives in World War I. Engineers were Mitcham, Keller, Smith and Land. County officials were Windham, Sessions, Roberts, Ziglar, Mullins and Archer. In 1977, through the efforts of the Dale County Historical Society, the Veterans Memorial Bridge was placed on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage by the Alabama Historical Commission.

SIDE 2:  Grist Mill - Indian Battle - Recreation
This land was purchased in 1832, by Henry Black who erected the first grist mill. In 1837 Creek Indians, who escaped from the Battle of Hobdy's Bridge, were routed here by Dale Militia. Subsequent mill owners were Hough, Frazier, Munn, Fleming and Beck. A post office called Scroggins Mill was established in 1844 with Edmund Black, postmaster; re-established as "River Mills” in 1877 with Daniel Munn, postmaster. The mill was used to operate wool carding machines during the War Between the States. This site was popular as an area recreation center from 1875 to 1950.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dale County Historical Society, 1979.

Henry County, Alabama»
1. Chattahoochee River Crossing
 
Location: Located near the McKemie Bridge on Alabama Highway 10, fourteen miles east of Abbeville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 11, 1979
Marker Text: 
First settler crossings were made here prior to 1817 on a log ferry operated by Robert Irwin. First bridge built by Prescott and Bemis and destroyed by flood of 1855. Second wooden covered bridge was completed in 1869 by ex-slave Horace King. Third was the Henry-Clay cantilever bridge opened in 1925. Fourth is the present McKemie Bridge opened in 1973. This river was the number one highway for local prehistorical man long before Christ. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1978.

2. Cureton Bridge Post Office
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 25, 1988
SIDE 1: 
The Cureton Bridge Post Office was established here August 21, 1850. The first postmaster was James U. Cureton who served until 1852. John A. Wood became postmaster and continued in this position until the office was discontinued in 1866. It was re-established July 21, 1870 with Daniel A. Wiggins as postmaster until 1880. The next postmaster was Nancy Willis who served until the post office was discontinued on September 17, 1904 and moved to Capps Station. The mail carrier at that time was Jackson Riley. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1988.

SIDE 2:  Cureton Bridge
Cureton Bridge was an old settlement named for the Cureton family who settled here in the early 1820's. The village was located on the East Fork of the Choctawhatchee River in the western part of Henry County and the northeast of what later became the Center Community. William Jackson Cureton, 1760-1832, was a native of Virginia who moved here about 1825. He constructed a private bridge across the Choctawhatchee River one mile east of here which was the first to be built over this waterway. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1988.

3. First Baptist Church of Headland
 
Location: Located at the Church: 301 East Church Street, Headland, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 19, 1979
Marker Text: 
Organized in 1867, as the Baptist Church of Christ at Bethlehem, it was located at 1 Cleveland Street. Reverend Thomas Scott was first pastor. William Whitehead was first deacon. Moved to East Church and Peachtree Street in 1893. Moved to present site in 1909. Name changed to Headland Missionary Baptist Church. Name changed to First Baptist Church of Headland in 1954.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1979.

4. Franklin - First Beachhead into East Alabama
 
Location: Located near the McKemie Bridge on Alabama Highway 10, fourteen miles east of Abbeville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 21, 1979
Marker Text: 
The frontier village of Franklin was established here by Colonel Robert Irwin in 1814 on the site of the Indian town of Cheeska Talofa. It was the first colonial village in east Alabama. Fort Gaines, Georgia, was constructed in 1816 to protect the early settlers in this former Creek Indian Nation, West. Twenty-one blocks were laid off for this promising river port of Abbeville. This prospective early city never recovered from the destructive flood of 1888.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1978.

5. HEADLAND, ALABAMA
 
Location: Headland Public Square, Headland, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2005
SIDE 1: 
James Joshua Head (1839-1927) founded Headland in 1871 as Heads Land. He patented land, platted the town and built his home. The Post Office opened, as Headland, on October 10, 1871. J. J. Head sold Headland to Hosey C. Powell in 1879, who sold to Dr. Wyatt S. Oates in 1880. J. J. Head moved to Tampa, Florida in 1883 and later established Lake Magdalene. Headland incorporated in 1884 with 26 white and 4 black petitioners. The railroad and depot were built in 1893. Headland grew into Henry Countys largest city by 2000.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Henry County Historical Group, Headland Kiwanis Club and The Headland National Bank, 2005.

SIDE 2:  HEADLAND PUBLIC SQUARE
This public square was laid off in 1871 by J. J. Head with a vision for a branch court house. Henry County voters decided in the 1879 and 1885 court house site elections not to locate a court house on the public square. Henry has been Alabamas only County with three court houses at the same time. The Alabama Supreme Court ruled in 1908 that the town of Headland had title to the square instead of Dr. W. S. Oates (1852-1913), who had claimed title when he purchased the town in 1880. Dr. Oates was instrumental in the development of Headland. The first public statue in Henry County was erected on the square in 1926 and the square was paved in 1935.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Henry County Historical Group and Friends of Headland, 2005.

6. Henry, the Mother County
 
Location: Located on the lawn of the Henry County Courthouse, Abbeville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 18, 1979
Marker Text: 
Upon formation, Henry County was the largest county within Alabama, composing all or portion of the present counties of Barbour, Coffee, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Geneva, Houston and Pike. When the youngest county of Houston was formed in 1903, Henry became the smallest. Franklin, the dead river port of Abbeville on the Chattahoochee River, was the colonial settler's first beachhead into the wild west of Creek Indian Territory after 1814. Old Henry was the original Alabama Wiregrass area. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1979.

7. Irwin Empire
 
Location: Located on Alabama Highway 10 at Shorterville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 20, 1979
Marker Text: 
Site of the 1831 Irwin Homeplace where 50,000 acres of land was owned by Major General William Irwin (1794-1850). He was an Indian fighter, farmer, politician, statesman, and considered one of the nation's richest and most influential men. A portion of his land was awarded for services rendered during the Indian Wars. Irwinton (Eufaula) was his namesake. He was a major force in the disposition of the last Indian lands. He drowned in the Chattahoochee River and was buried near his homesite.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1979.

8. Lawrenceville
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 431 at Lawrenceville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 12, 1978
SIDE 1: 
This cultural, educational and religious center in east Alabama was settled in 1823 and named for Joseph Lawrence, prominent pioneer, farmer, and extensive land owner. A Baptist and a Methodist Church were established here prior to 1830. The first settlers of this area came from the Carolinas and Georgia, crossing the Chattahoochee River at Franklin and squatting here until land could be purchased in 1828.

SIDE 2:  Lawrenceville Academy
The first and foremost educational facility in east Alabama opened here prior to 1840. It later became the Masonic Male and Female Institute. This pioneer school was active for 50 years graduating such outstanding personalities as Anson West, DDV, Methodist minister, missionary, author, educator, and William C. Oates, Governor of Alabama, Colonel C.S.A., General U.S.A., and author.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1978.

9. Liberty United Methodist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 23, 1989
SIDE 1: 
Also called Liberty Chapel, the Church was organized circa 1830 and originally located three miles northeast of this site, on the Old Liberty Church Road. Anson West, the prominent Methodist historian was licensed to exhort there November 3, 1855. In 1873, the building was dismantled and moved to this site, donated by the Peacock Family, to be used as a place of Divine Worship. It was used as a schoolhouse for many years. Using much of the original material, the church was rebuilt in 1914 and later enclosed with brick. Sunday School rooms, bathrooms, kitchen and fellowship hall were added in recent years.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1989.

SIDE 2:  Hilliardsville
Hilliardsville post office was established near here on May 18, 1850, with Washington H. Peacock as its first postmaster, followed in 1860 by John M. Woods. Discontinued during the Civil War, the post office was re-established in 1872 with Matilda Thompson as postmistress. Later appointments were John P. Crawford in 1876, Matilda Thompson again in 1878, James A. Phillips and Richard Knight in 1882, Mattie R. Bedell in 1883, John C. McLeod, Maggie E. Johnston in 1884, and William F. Watford in 1887. His son, John W. Watford served from 1897 until October 15, 1907, when mail service was transferred to the Abbeville Post Office.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1989.

10. Methodist Episcopal Church, South
 
Location: Located in front of the church, East Washington Street, Abbeville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 27, 1979
Marker Text: 
Erected 1896

Erected to the Glory of God. The Methodist Church in Abbeville was established circa 1830 as a mission of the Lawrenceville circuit. The 1850 church was erected north of the present post office on East Washington Street. Present church retains most of its original features including bell and belfry, parquet ceiling and hand finished beams. First Sunday School annex built in 1949 with addition in 1958. Proclaimed Henry County's number one historical structure in 1973 by Henry County Historical Society. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1979.

11. Mt. Enon Primitive Baptist Church
 
Location: Located at the Church off Henry County Road 54 in Edwin, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 16, 1979
Marker Text: 
This early settlers' church was constituted as a member of the Choctawhatchee Association District here on the Eufaula-Ozark Wagon Train Road, April 23, 1860. First Presbytery was M.W. Helms and J.J. Dickerson, Deacon William Hasten and Clerk D.R. Clanton. About 50 members composed the first membership. Other elders were: Aaron Helms, S.S. Pellum, L. H. Stuckey, P. L. Thomas, Henry Pellum, Albert Lee Ray, W. I. Kelley, Alto Walker, Tom McGowin, R.K. Blaskshear, and S. J. B. Dallas. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1979.

12. MT. ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Location: 1115 Stovall Drive, Haleburg, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 24, 2004
Marker Text: 
Constituted to the Glory of God, circa 1871, by former slaves in the area that later became Halesburg (now Haleburg), Alabama in 1885. Mt. Zion Church is one of the oldest African-American wooden frame churches in service in Alabama's Wiregrass section. The church cemetery contains many graves of former slaves who gained their freedom at the end of the Civil War in 1865. Tradition states that the original sanctuary remains with improvements added over time. Mt. Zion Baptist Church was placed on the Alabama Register of Historic Places in 1985. In 2003, preservation efforts were finished by the church family with help from many friends.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Mt. Zion Baptist Church Family and the Henry County Historical Group, Inc., 2004.

13. NEWVILLE, ALABAMA
 
Location: 9127 County Road 99, Headland, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 7, 2004
SIDE 1: 
Side 1 James Madison Wells founded a village called Wells circa 1882. When Abbeville Southern Railroad laid tracks through the town in 1893, its name was changed to Wells Station. The post office was built in 1894. Wells Station incorporated as "Newville" in 1903. The town of Newvillebecame prosperous with merchants, banks, lodges, doctors, churches, a Newville High School, a Rosenwald High School, societies, a newspaper, a depot, sawmills, cotton gins, mule stables and all the elements required by a developing town. Newville's slow decline commenced after the great depression due to farm mechanization and loss of commerce.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, The Henry County Historical Group and Friends of Newville, 2004.

SIDE 2:  NEWVILLE PIONEERS
Pioneer men and women of Wells and Newville were farmers, housewives, laborers, tradesmen and entrepreneurs seeking a better life. These pioneers were risk takers who forged a new village and town. Some of these hard working adventurers included pioneering families of: James M. Wells, T. J. Bond, Moses M. Bond, Henry L. Brackin, John Griffin, H. C. Price, Joe Whiddon, Jim Griffin, Dr. Carl T. Jones, Dr. Littleton T. Hutto, James W. Capps, Bud Coley, Abner Jackson, Dr. A. L. Whigham, Lawrence Cotton, Eddie Kirkland, Joe McClendon, John W. Whiddon, Joseph S. Kirkland, William Kirkland and others.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, The Henry County Historical Group and Friends of Newville, 2004.

14. Pelham House
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 1991
SIDE 1: 
Originally constructed about 1820 as a single pen log dwelling, this building was later enlarged into a dogtrot house and covered with weatherboards. It was situated next to the earliest Henry County road known as the Irwinton (Eufaula), Franklin, Columbia Postal-Stagecoach River Road. It is an excellent example of the oldest type of folk house in the lower Chattahoochee Valley. Preserved by the L.F. Mills family for over 100 years, this house was disassembled, moved and restored on this site by the A. J. Rane family of Abbeville.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Henry County Historical Society and the Great Southern Wood Preserving Company, Inc., 1991

SIDE 2:  Abbeville Southern Railroad
For the first 75 years of its history, Abbeville's commerce was tied directly to the Chattahoochee River by Indian trails and wagon roads. The arrival of the first train on the Abbeville Southern Railroad, November 27, 1893, signaled the dawn of a new era in Abbeville’s commercial life. In the December 1, 1893 issue of the Abbeville Times, the editor described the arrival which was received by "hundreds of people with happy and throbbing hearts." Railroad workers were treated to a holiday and parade the next day “with over one hundred and thirty mules and as many or more laborers leading the band.”

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Henry County Historical Society and the Great Southern Wood Preserving Company, Inc., 1991

15. Seven Flags and an Arrow over Abbeville
 
Location: Located on the lawn of Abbeville City Hall, Abbeville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 7, 1979
SIDE 1: 
Pre-historical man; Creek Indian Nation, West 1519-1814; Spanish Florida 1540-1702; French Louisiana 1702-1763; British West Florida 1763-1780; Spanish West Florida 1780-1813; United States 1813-1861; Georgia Territory 1732-1802; Mississippi Territory 1798-1804; Alabama Territory 1817-1819; Washington County 1800-1812; Conecuh County 1818-1819; Confederate States of America 1861-1865; United States 1865-. Abbe, an Indian name of nearby Creek meaning a grove of dogwood trees.

SIDE 2: 
The oldest remaining colonial settlement in east Alabama from Florida to the Tennessee line and older than the County of Henry and the State of Alabama. An active trading post was located here in Alabama Territory on "The Hill" early in 1819. The first settler gateway to the Wiregrass was at Franklin, located 14 miles east.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1978.

16. Showplace of the South
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 4, 1996
SIDE 1: 
The Mansion" was built in the 1830's on this site by Colonel James Bennett and his wife, Harriet M. Grace. Tradition maintains that it was the only three story antebellum home in the Chattahoochee Valley. The top floor was a ballroom. Six columns spanned the façade which included a winding staircase. "The Mansion" could be seen from the Chattahoochee River and was know by riverboat travelers as "The Showplace of the South." James Bennett came to Alabama in 1817 with his father, Luke Bennett. They first settled on a ridge between what is now Clayton and Louisville along with James Arthur, Pious Chambers, and others.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Bennett Family, 1996.

SIDE 2:  Showplace of the South
The "Mansion" later burned to the ground leaving only the kitchen standing. Its construction of 10” x 10” beams set on concrete blocks made of sand and pebbles from the property. Cut nails and large steel spikes were used throughout the building. The cemetery here holds the graves of Colonel James Bennett; Bartlett Smith Bennett, infant son; James W. Bennett, CSA; John B. Bennett, CSA; the Bennett slaves; and the construction overseer from New York, Mr. Williams, who died of pneumonia before "The Mansion” was completed. Harriet Grace Bennett rests in an unmarked grave in the Shorterville Baptist Church cemetery near her son Thomas.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Bennett Family, 1996.

17. The Bethune-Kennedy House
 
Location: Located at 302 Kirkland Street, Abbeville, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 6, 1987
Marker Text: 
This rare, dual front door, double pen Creole cottage was constructed circa 1840 on the military three-notch road, now Kirkland Street. It is the oldest remaining structure in Abbeville. Earliest known owner was Confederate Colonel William Calvin Bethune, M.D. Last owner-dweller was Mollie Kennedy. To avoid immediate demolition, it was purchased in 1976, placed on the National Register in 1978 and initially restored by the Henry County Historical Society. It is presently owned by the Abbeville Chamber of Commerce.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Abbeville Chamber of Commerce, 1986.

18. The Southeast Alabama Agricultural School
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 29, 1990
SIDE 1: 
This school and experiment station was created by Alabama Legislative Act No. 579, February 28, 1889. This was the first school in Alabama to offer free secondary education. SAAS was also the state's and Auburn’s first junior college. Probate Judge John B. Ward is known as the "father of the college". He lobbied for a two story brick building which finally was completed in 1898. The first 1889 classes were held at The Abbeville Academy until the main building was completed. Later, similar wooden structure schools were established in each congressional district.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1990

SIDE 2:  First Free Secondary School
SAAS opened September 16, 1889 at The Abbeville Academy. Abbeville was referred to as "the educational center of the southeastern United States" by the Abbeville Times. Renowned Lawrenceville Academy headmaster Joseph A. Espy was the first president of the “agriculture college”. Local homes boarded the students from five counties and three states. The school had 227 students during the 1890 commencement, with graduating exercises lasting four days at the new brick courthouse on the square. Several name changes have occurred since its founding. In 1943, Abbeville Secondary Agriculture School became Abbeville High School. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Henry County Historical Society, 1990

Houston County, Alabama»
1. Ashford Depot
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 15, 1989
Marker Text: 
This depot, an example of late 19th century Victorian railroad architecture, was constructed by the Alabama Midland Railroad in March, 1888 as a way station on the Bainbridge-to-Montgomery route. The depot was the only building to survive a devastating 1915 fire which destroyed the original town area parallel to the railroad track. The Ashford Depot Committee has restored the building to its former appearance and has furnished it with original antiques. The depot houses an "Artifacts of the Wiregrass Museum", political history memorabilia and has a community room for use by area citizens.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Ashford Depot Committee, 1989.

2. Ashford United Methodist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 1990
Marker Text: 
This building site was purchased March 9, 1889 by trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of Gordon Circuit. Services were held in a three-walled wood structure until the completion of a permanent building in 1893. In 1927 a brick building replaced this structure which burned in 1924. When a larger sanctuary was built in 1956, the old sanctuary became the fellowship hall. In 1987 an education building was constructed. The following year the sanctuary was renovated and stained glass windows were installed. "They that trust in the Lord shall be as mount Zion, which cannot be removed, but abideth forever." Psalm 125:1.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Ashford United Methodist Church, 1990.

3. Big Creek United Methodist Church
 
Location: Located in Houston County Route 115, ten miles south of The Ross Clark Circle, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 21, 1979
SIDE 1: 
One of the oldest churches in southeast Alabama and reportedly the oldest church in Houston County. The first church structure was a log building constructed about 20 yards north of the present building. The second structure was a larger frame building erected in 1865. In 1905, a new frame structure was built. Four Sunday School rooms and a brick exterior were added to the church in 1959.

SIDE 2:  Big Creek United Methodist Church
Adjacent to Big Creek United Methodist Church is a cemetery containing the grave of Joseph Watford. Mr. Watford served as a soldier for four years during the American Revolutionary War. In 1833, he emigrated from South Carolina to this area of southeast Alabama. He died in July 1845. Mr. Watford is believed to be the only Revolutionary War Veteran buried in Houston County.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1979.

4. Boyhood Home of Reverend Bob Jones
 
Location: Located on Highway 84 West at the entrance to the Highlands.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 1, 1995
Marker Text: 
Near this spot was the boyhood home of Reverend Bob Jones, (1884-1968), D.D., L.L.D., internationally known evangelist and founder of Bob Jones University. The eleventh child of W. Alexander and Georgia Creel Jones, he was three months old when the family moved to Brannon Stand in 1884, where he lived until his father's death in 1900. Four years after his conversion at the age of eleven, Bob Jones held his first revival under a brush arbor two miles from here. The only structure remaining today from his boyhood home is the brick water well, located on Edinburgh Way just inside the Highland Oaks Golf Course entrance.

Erected by Bob Jones University, Wheelless Development, Ltd., and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1995.

5. Cherry Street African Methodist Episcopal Church
 
Location: Located at the Church, 308 North Cherry Street, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 28, 1979
Marker Text: 
On this site in 1877 Gaines Chapel Church was organized. A wooden structure was erected adjacent to an existing graveyard. In 1891 and 1901 additional land was purchased. In 1908 the present building was dedicated. This structure was of early twentieth century design. At this time its name was changed to Cherry Street AME Church. The Church has been declared the "Mother Church" of the AME denomination in the State of Alabama. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1979.

6. Columbia Baptist Church
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1990
SIDE 1: 
This church was constituted in 1835 following the withdrawal of six people from Omussee Baptist Church in a dispute over the role of missions. The first pastor Edmund Talbot, who served the Church until 1853, donated that land and had the church built at his own expense. It was situated at the present site of the Willis J. Bell grave in Columbia Cemetery. In 1859 a new building was constructed by Nathaniel Ferris Oakley just to the south of the original church. This was replaced by a red brick auditorium which was erected in 1885.

Erected by the Columbia Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1990.

SIDE 2:  Columbia Baptist Church
The Omussee Baptist Church dissolved shortly after the "split-off" which resulted in the organization of the Columbia Baptist Church. Both churches probably belonged to the Chattahoochee River Association in their formative years. In 1839 the Church joined the Bethel Association of Georgia. It later affiliated with the Judson Association. On November 7, 1885 the Columbia Baptist Church participated in the organization meeting of the Columbia Baptist Association which was held at Bluff Spring Church in Henry County, Alabama.

Erected by the Columbia Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1990.

7. Dothan First Baptist Church
 
Location: Located at 509 West Main Street, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 6, 1987
Marker Text: 
In November 1887 nine charter members organized the First Baptist Church of Dothan. In 1888 the Church erected a one room frame structure at 205 South Saint Andrews Street. A beautiful Gothic brick building in the SE corner of Main and Oates Streets was built in 1893 by the 120 members. By 1928 the congregation of 1,712 commenced services on this present site, 300 West Main Street. This Centennial year, 1987, having 21 pastors and established five other churches, the 4,569 members are engaged in a six million dollar expansion program. Our cornerstone, "The love of Christ constraineth us."

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and First Baptist Church, Dothan, 1987.

8. Dothan Opera House
 
Location: Located at the Opera House, 103 North St. Andrews Street, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 11, 1979
Marker Text: 
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the Department of the Interior December 16, 1977, through the efforts of the Dothan Landmarks Foundation, Incorporated. Constructed in 1915, this three-story masonry structure remains basically unaltered from its original plan. It has had an important cultural influence on Dothan, attracting from its early days, a wide variety of performing groups. It was completely renovated and restored in 1971. This splendid building, long noted for its fine acoustics, has seen a revival of its original cultural activities.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

9. First Missionary Baptist Church Dothan, Alabama
 
Location: 370 Chickasaw Street, Dothan, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 31, 2005
SIDE 1: 
In 1889, Georgia Baptists led by Reverend W. M. Carter organized the New Hope Baptist Church in the village of Poplar Head. Reverend Robert Nelson was called as the first pastor. In 1907, newly-elected trustees incorporated its successor, the First Colored Baptist Church. In 1912, under pastor Dr. Thomas Bellinger of Pensacola, the church purchased land from the Saxon family, erected its original building, and renamed itself the First Missionary Baptist Church. The pastorate of Reverend C. C. Clency began in 1926 but ended in a schism that resulted in creating the North Highland Baptist Church.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the first Missionary Baptist Church, 2004.

(to be erected soon)

SIDE 2:  First Missionary Baptist Church Dothan, Alabama
In 1940, the City of Dothan auctioned the Church property for unpaid gutter and curb assessments. The Church later regained ownership of its property and constructed its 1962 education building during the pastorate of Reverend Howard Creecy, Sr., of New Orleans. Reverend Rochester Johnson served from 1972 to 1992 and oversaw construction of a fellowship hall. The Church buried a centennial capsule near the halls entrance in 1989. The parsonage, parking lot, education wing, and fellowship wing complete the Churchs physical plant. First Missionary Baptist Church was listed on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in 2001, while Reverend B. K. Marshall was pastor.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the First Missionary Baptist Church, 2004.

10. GORDON BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Location: Gordon Baptist Church, Leslie Street, Gordon, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 16, 2004
SIDE 1: 
Side 1

Baptists of Gordon first erected a brush arbor church, Hope Arbor, circa 1819. On May 16, 1867 James Pynes gave one acre and timber to build a church in the town center. Pynes, William Wood and John T. Davis, Building Committee, signed the contract; 41 members pledged amountsfrom $5 to $500. Completed in 1868, it had a high portico with white columns and along flight of steps across the width of the portico. A square steeple with belfry topped the roof. Inside were wooden benches and a rear balcony. This wooden building later burned.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Gordon Baptist Church and Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 2004.

SIDE 2:  GORDON BAPTIST CHURCH
Side 2

In 1907 plans were laid for the present brick church. Building Committee members were Sam Bowdon, E. L. Marbury, W. E. McEachern, J. B. Martin and T. D. McEachern. Solicitation Committee members included Marbury, Dr. C. E. Granberry, J. W. Britt, T. D. McEachern, and C. P. Bowdon. Committee to Secure a Lot Members were Dr. Granberry, W. E. McEachern, and Judge George Leslie. Although a struggle to finance and complete at a time of major economic downturn, minutes reflect E. L. Marbury was instructed June 12, 1910 to finish the building on his estimate of $400 for additional costs. Sam Bowdon gave a Tiffany-style stained glass window.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Gordon Baptist Church and Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 2004.

(to be erected soon)

11. Gordon Cemetery
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 2000
SIDE 1: 
Mr. William Wood (b. 22 Mar. 1826, d. 15 Oct. 1885), a prominent Gordon businessman, donated one acre of land located north of the town center adjacent to the old river road, now U.S. Highway 95, from his large plantation estate to the Town of Gordon for the purpose of establishing a permanent cemetery for the town. In 1859 Mr. Wood was elected to the Alabama State Senate, serving four years. He was also an active Mason and served as mayor of Gordon. A prosperous merchant, he established two riverboat landings at Gordon, known as the Upper and Middle landings.

SIDE 2: 
Below are some of the prominent early Gordon citizens buried in this cemetery. Mr. Arthur J. Bowdon, b. 1809

Mr. William Wood, b. 1826

Mr. Samuel Bowdon, b. 1835

Mr. Samuel J. Hall, b. 1837

Mr. McKelvey C. Marsh, b. 1848

Mr. Ben F. Snead, b. 1851

Mr. William G. Roundtree, Jr., b. 1852

Dr. T. R. McLendon, b. 1854

Mr. John R. Espy, b. 1856

Mr. E. F. Tuttle, b. 1858

Erected by Descendants of the above Gordon Families

The Dothan Landmarks Foundation

And the Historic Chattahoochee Commission

2000

12. Headland Presbyterian Church
 
Location: Located off U.S. Highway 431, north of Dothan, Alabama at Landmark Park, on the grounds of the church.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 15, 1985
SIDE 1: 
Organized on July 8, 1897 by the commission of South Alabama Presbytery. From the original seventeen members, J.D. Jones, N. M. McDonald, and I. M. Barton were elected ruling elders and Dr. Charles Sporman, D. R. Redding, and W. R. McDonald were elected deacons. A site on Scott Street, one block south of the square, was donated by Dr. Sporman and a building committee was appointed. $240 was subscribed for building materials from the membership. Around turn-of-the-century, a businessman by the name of Priced moved to Headland and joined the church. He offered to provide most of the labor and materials for the building.

SIDE 2:  Headland Presbyterian Church
The East Alabama Presbytery announced in Montgomery on October 13, 1908 that "By special help from Montgomery First Church and Dothan, the congregation at Headland was encouraged to build and has just completed a lovely church 35 x 35 and owe no man anything except to love one another." The membership declined and on September 18, 1966 the Church was dissolved by the Presbytery. The building was donated to Landmark Park by Mr. Sporman Knowles and moved to its present site in 1983. The church was then restored and furnished with the help of the Headland Community and other friends of Landmarks. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1985.

13. Houston County
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 12, 2003
Marker Text: 
After much politicking, on February 9, 1903, delegates from this area, T. M. Espy, Byrd Farmer, and George H. Malone, were successful in getting a bill passed in the State Legislature to form a new county from parts of Henry, Dale and Geneva counties. The new county was named Houston after former Governor George S. Houston. On March 16, 1903 an election was held to choose a new county seat and Dothan won. In 1905 the Houston County courthouse was dedicated on this corner. In 1960 the first building was torn down and a new one was constructed. The new building opened in April, 1962.

The 1962 building was renovated in 2002.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Houston County Commission, Houston County Centennial Committee, 2003

14. Liberty Baptist Church
 
Location: 477 Liberty Road, Pansey, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 8, 2004
Marker Text: 
The church was organized in 1867 under a brush arbor very near the present sanctuary. The brush arbor was replaced by a log building and services were conducted in the log building until approximately 1895. It was in 1895 that Liberty Baptist Church joined the Columbia Baptist ssociation by petition. In 1896 a stacked plank frame building replaced the log building and was used until 1923. In 1924 the present sanctuary was built. All new converts were baptized in Cedar Creek.

"Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, and intohis courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and bless his name." Psalm 100:4

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Liberty Baptist Church, 2004.

15. Main Street Commercial Historic District
 
Location: Located at Main Street and Foster Street, downtown, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 14, 1988
SIDE 1: 
The District encompasses the old downtown commercial center of Dothan and is characterized by a high concentration of closely spaced commercial and warehouse structures. The buildings in the District span the period of Dothan's early growth from 1885 to 1930. During this time Dothan grew from a small rural town into the trade and transportation nucleus of the Wiregrass, the last area of Alabama to be settled and developed. The District is composed of simple, one-story brick buildings as well as larger, more ornate urban-type structures such as the five-story Young Building.

SIDE 2:  Main Street Commercial Historic District
Contained within this district are a variety of brick, stone and concrete block structures which illustrate the function of the downtown area as the business center of Dothan. This section of the city began losing its importance as a commercial hub in the late 1960's when retail businesses began moving to outlying shopping centers and malls. Many buildings were vacated but efforts to preserve the historical significance of the area continue. The Main Street District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983, through the efforts of the Dothan Landmarks Foundation.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1985.

16. Mallalieu Seminary
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 16, 1993
SIDE 1: 
Organized in 1882 at nearby Rocky Creek Methodist Church for educational purposes. This school, which occupied approximately seven acres surrounding this marker, was supported by the Methodist Episcopal Church North. This school was first known as Forest Home Seminary and later named after Bishop Willard Francis Mallalieu. It was burned on 1885 by unknown sources, but was quickly rebuilt.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Town of Kinsey, Houston County Commission and Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1993.

SIDE 2:  Mallalieu Seminary
One of the few institutions of higher learning in Southeast Alabama, the Mallalieu Seminary taught grades one through twelve and offered courses such as Greek, Algebra, Latin, History, Chemistry, Music, Geology and the New and Old Testament. The Mallalieu Seminary permanently closed October 31, 1923 when the Methodist Episcopal Church North could no longer financially support the school.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Town of Kinsey, Houston County Commission and Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1993.

17. Old Columbia Jail
 
Location: Located at the Jail, North Street, Columbia, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 10, 1978
SIDE 1: 
Erected sometime in the early 1860's, the Old Columbia Jail is today one of the last wooden jails still standing in Alabama. Originally, there were two cells, each measuring 10 x 15 feet. Interior walls are studded every two inches with iron spikes to prevent prisoners from being able to escape. The Columbia Women's Club and the Columbia Bicentennial Committee have completely renovated the building as a museum to preserve some of the articles of historical interest to Columbia citizens.

SIDE 2:  Columbia
Formerly a prominent Chattahoochee River port-of-call, Columbia served as a major trading center for communities throughout the Wiregrass area of Alabama. Between 1822-1833, it was the county seat for Henry County which then comprised portions of present day Covington, Dale, Barbour, Coffee, Crenshaw, Bullock, Geneva and Houston Counties. At the turn of the century, Columbia was bypassed by the Alabama Midland Railway in favor of Dothan. As the railroads continued to take freight trade away from the riverboats, Columbia's position as a principal trade center began to decline. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

18. Poplar Head Spring
 
Location: Located at Poplar Head Park, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 2, 1982
Marker Text: 
Located near this market is the Poplar Head Spring which served as a meeting place for Indian traders prior to the arrival of the white and black settlers. The Alibamu Indians of the Chattahoochee River basin met the Creeks of the Choctawhatchee River basin at the springs frequently to trade. The first whites and blacks arrived in the early 1830's. Of these the lumber and turpentine operators came first. They were followed by William Cawthon, a cattle king from Georgia. By 1858, the community now called Poplar Head had nine families. However, the turmoil of the War Between the States and Reconstruction resulted in virtual abandonment of the community. In 1881, only 3 families lived at Poplar Head Spring. However, by 1885, enough families had settled in Poplar Head to meet the minimum size needed to incorporate. Through a special election on November 10, 1885, Poplar Head community became Dothan, a city to be.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

19. Purcell-Killingsworth House
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 25, 1989
Marker Text: 
This house, also known as Travelers Rest, was completed in 1890 by William Henry Purcell (1845-1910) a prominent Columbia businessman and politician. Purcell had many business interests including a steamboat landing on the Chattahoochee River. This was the boyhood home of Bishop Clare Purcell (1884-1964) who, in 1955, was elected President of the Council of Bishops, the highest place of recognition ever achieved by a native-born Alabama Methodist minister. In 1946 the Purcell family sold the two acre homestead to Mr. & Mrs. Henry Killingsworth who have meticulously restored this imposing Victorian mansion. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places December 16, 1982.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Purcell Family, 1989.

20. Southern Boundary of the United States, 1795-1819
 
Location: Located on Highway 231 at Ellicott's Crossing.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 27, 1995
Marker Text: 
On October 27, 1795, the United States concluded the Treaty of San Lorenzo with Spain, establishing 31 north latitude as the boundary between its southern territory and West Florida. Despite Spanish delays, commissions representing the two countries began the eastward survey at the Mississippi River. They passed this point in August 1799, and continued to the Chattahoochee River. They later abandoned the boundary survey east of the river due to persistent Indian attacks. The 381 mile survey became known as Ellicott's line in reference to Andrew Ellicott, surveyor for the U.S. commission.

Erected by the Houston County Commission, Dothan Landmarks Foundation, and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1995.

21. The Naming of Dothan
 
Location: Located at Millennium Park, Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 30, 2001
SIDE 1: 
Near the location of Poplar Head Park (200 feet west of this marker) was once a large spring surrounded by poplar trees. Two well-beaten trails crossed near the spring and the area was often used as a camping and resting place for Native Americans and early settlers. In the early 1800's William Cawthon, from Georgia, built a corral for his cattle near the spring and the area first became known as "Cawthon's Cowpen." Later, several families built log cabins nearby and dubbed the little settlement "Poplar Head" due to poplar trees and spring.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Wiregrass Museum of Art, Houston County Kiwanis Club, The Downtown Group, 2001.

SIDE 2:  The Naming of Dothan
In 1858, the tiny Poplar Head Community requested a post office. Since there was a town called Poplar Spring in the state, the postal authorities arbitrarily assigned the name Dothan to the new post office to prevent misdirected mail. Early maps and documents show the town name was spelled two different ways: Dothen or Dothan. The city fathers finally settled on the spelling to coincide with the Bible passage "For I heard them say 'Let us go down to Dothan' " (Genesis 37:17) when the town was officially incorporated on November 10, 1885.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Wiregrass Museum of Art, Houston County Kiwanis Club, The Downtown Group, 2001.

22. The Waddell House
 
Location: Located at Dothan Landmark Park off U.S. Highway 431, four miles from downtown Dothan, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 9, 1979
SIDE 1: 
This quaint turn of the century farmhouse originally stood on an 80 acre farm, located 2 miles west of the Houston County Courthouse. The house was built by Bud Bush of heart pine lumber from the sawmill owned and operated by Lesker H. Waddell. In 1906 Mr. Waddell purchased the house and acreage, completely furnishing it during the next three years. In 1909 he brought his bride, Gypsy Hall, to live on the farm. Three children, Earl, Byrd and Iona were born in this house. The house and furnishings remained unaltered until the death of Mrs. Waddell in 1976. Mr. Waddell died in 1956.

SIDE 2:  The Waddell House
This house was threatened with destruction by Dothan's rapid growth. In 1978 the Waddell Family donated the house and outbuildings to the Dothan Landmarks Foundation. In January 1979 these buildings were moved to this site as the first phase toward the development of the Landmarks Center for Natural Science and History. Today this house and surrounding land stand as a living memorial to the early farmers of the Wiregrass Area who contributed so much to our heritage.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Dothan Landmarks Foundation, 1979.

Lee County, Alabama»
1. AUBURN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FOUNDER'S CHAPEL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
In 1836 Judge John Harper with 34 other Methodists from Harris County, Georgiasettled here. They built a log structure on this site, the first church and school in Auburn.In 1856 church leaders inspired the Methodist Conference to open East Alabama Male College. It later became a state institution and namedAuburn University in 1960. In 1899 this building was encased in brick and the pipe organ installed.It became a fellowship hall when the sanctuary was built in 1955. In 1992 it was restored and named Founder's Chapel.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Preservation Alliance of Auburn, 2004.

2. AUBURN UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 7, 1995
SIDE 1:  AUBURN UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
The University Chapel is the oldest public building in the city of Auburn. Built as a Presbyterian Church, the first service was held in the original Greek Revival-style building on September 13, 1851. Edwin Reese, spiritual leader to the tiny congregation, had the bricks made by slaves on his plantation. The founder of the town, Judge John J. Harper, gave the land. The first minister was the Reverend Albert Shotwell. The small church has seen several renovations over the years, and dramatically changed in appearance from Greek Revival to Gothic style. Originally the church had two entrances, one for men and one for women. The church building has served many purposes, and played an integral part in the town's history. In the 19th Century it was used as a Confederate hospital, a meeting place for the first Episcopal congregation and in 1887 when the main building burned at Alabama Polytechnic Institute, the college used the building for a temporary classroom. By 1917, the Presbyterian congregation with over 100 members, moved to their new building on the corner of Gay and Thach. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the Department of the Interior, National Park Service, May 22, 1973.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1994.

SIDE 2:  AUBURN UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
In 1921, the Alabama Polytechnic Institute acquired the building which had been renovated in a Gothic style around 1900. Until 1926 it served a variety of social functions housing the U.S.O. and later the Y.M.C.A. - Y.W.C.A., giving it the long time sobriquet the "Y" Hut. On July 27, 1926, the Auburn Players made their debut performance, and until 1973 it was University Theatre. In 1976, after extensive renovation designed by Professor Nicholas Davis, the old church re-opened as the University Chapel, and interdenominational, multipurpose building. During renovation, the hand-made trusses, girders and joists, slotted and pegged together, were discovered. The new ceiling was built above this wooden network to highlight this original feature. The new entrance doors are replicas of the originals, as is the steeple. The beautiful old bricks were cleaned, repaired, and a new layer of mortar put into the joints. Landscaped walkways and curving brick walls were all added. Funds for the project were given by the E. L. Spencer, Jr. family. It stands today as a blend of the old and the new, a reminder of Auburn's religious, academic, and social history.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1994.

3. BAPTIST HILL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 5, 1995
SIDE 1:  BAPTIST HILL
Auburn's first separate black community cemetery offers a rich source of the city’s black heritage. Much of the history is oral but it is known that a white man gave most of the land in the early 1870’s. The four acre cemetery contains over 500 marked graves and many others are unmarked. The oldest grave is dated 1879. Those interred here are a cross section of the city’s blacks. Many were born slaves but later succeeded in teaching or business. The cemetery is still in use and is maintained by the City of Auburn but its ownership is unknown. Documentation of the site was done by the auburn Heritage Association in 1990.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1994.

SIDE 2:  BAPTIST HILL
Though located at the base of a slope, the cemetery derives its name from Ebenezer Baptist Church on a hill to the west. Ebenezer, established in 1865, was the first black churched formed in Auburn after the Civil War. The church building was erected before 1870 on land donated by Lonnie Payne, a white man. The church was so prominent in the area that it gave the name "Baptist Hill" to the vicinity. Its members were the first buried in the cemetery although members of other black churches are now interred here. Ebenezer was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The cemetery was added to the Alabama Register in 1994.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1994.

4. BEAN'S MILL
 
Location: Located on US Highway 29 at mile marker 197 (approximately 6 miles east of Opelika)
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 2002
SIDE 1:  BEAN'S MILL
In 1832, Kotch,ar Yoholo owned the site. Moses Wheat and son, Francis, owned saw and grist mills on this site in the late 1830s. Francis died in 1838 from an accident at the mills. In 1852 the property was owned by John 'Jack' Floyd and son, James C. In 1858 John sold his share to James, who took Hiram Murphy as a partner. The Grist Mill washed out in 1874 and was replaced with a structure on stone foundations above normal high water. The mill remained in the Floyd Family until 1899. It is the only one left of several mills once located on Halawakee Creek.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Lee County Historical Society, 2002.

SIDE 2:  BEAN'S MILL
Here in 1897 the first iron bridge in Lee County was built. In 1903 George W. Bean bought the mill, operating it until his death in 1952. About 1910 Bean installed an iron overshot wheel to replace the old turbine. Later, the dam height was raised two feet. On March 30, 1939, FDR on his way to Warm Springs stopped his motorcade for a visit. In 1989 John M. Ross purchased the deteriorated mill with 80 acres. Ross reconstructed the mill to operating condition in 1997. On October 1, 1997, the Alabama Historical Commission placed it on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Lee County Historical Society, 2002.

5. CITY HALL
 
Location: Located at 144 Tichenor Avenue, Auburn, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 17, 2002
SIDE 1:  CITY HALL
In 1846, Auburn's Founder, Judge John J. Harper deeded the property on this corner to Simeon Perry, as town agent for two of the earliest public schools in Auburn. A member of the settlement party, Perry laid out the original boundaries of the City of Auburn. In 1931, the City of Auburn donated this land for a larger post office. Congress gave $90,000 for its construction and the building was completed in 1933, while Levi Knapp was Postmaster. First class status was attained here in 1940 under Postmaster Homer Wright, and it served as the post office until 1991. It was at least the seventh location for town postal service.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the City of Auburn and the Auburn Heritage Association, 2002

SIDE 2:  CITY HALL
The City of Auburn bought the building in 1992 for $375,000. In 1999, the City Council voted to renovate it as City Hall. It was dedicated in 2001. The building has a "Starved-Classical," symmetrical style, with pointed pediments, typical of Federal Depression architecture. These elements have been preserved through several additions and renovations. Postmasters who served Auburn on this site: Levi A. Knapp; Homer Wright; Mrs. Katherine Wright; Jay G. Hitchcock; Harold Nall; Charles M. Dawson; Bill Kitchen; J. Dan McLaughlin. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1983.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the City of Auburn and the Auburn Heritage Association, 2002

6. DARDEN HOUSE
 
Location: 1323 Auburn Street, Opelika, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  June 27, 2003
Marker Text: 
Dr. John Wesley Darden, was the first AfricanAmerican physician to treat patients within a 30-mile radius of Opelika. He built the Darden House in 1904, and later married Maude Jean Logan of Montgomery. Dr. and Mrs. Darden shaped many lives through their commitment to the community by providing better health care and education. The Darden House became the social and political center of the African American community in Opelika. Dr. Darden sometimes saw patients in a clinic on the main floor and many gatherings and events were held here over the years. Prominent visitors to the Darden House included Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver, and A. G. Gaston.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Opelika Historic Preservation Society, 2003.

7. DILLARD-LAWSON HOUSE
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2000
Marker Text: 
Built by Auburn merchant A. L. Dillard in 1894, the home was once part of the old Scott Plantation. It was one of the first homes in Auburn to have an indoor bath and electricity. An unusual feature of the house is the gray stone, for which Dillard invented a secret formula to make it moisture proof. Mrs. Dillard and her daughter were the first registered women voters in Lee County. In 1925, Sigma Pi Fraternity was chartered here. The James L. Lawson family owned the house from 1939-1984. It was home to Mabel Yearby, the first woman defense lawyer in Alabama. In 1984 the house was sold to business interests.

Erected by the Auburn Heritage Association and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2000.

8. EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH / BAPTIST HILL / EAST THACH AVENUE
 
Location: ocated at the Church on East Thach Avenue, Auburn, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 10, 1978
SIDE 1:  EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH / BAPTIST HILL / EAST THACH AVENUE
This simple frame structure was built by newly freed black men and women before 1870. The property on which the building stands was given to a member of the Ebenezer congregation in 1865, the year the War Between the States ended, by a white landowner, Lonnie Payne. The church is built of hand hewn logs, felled on the Frazer plantation, northeast of Auburn, and were hauled by mule to this site. Members of the congregation constructed the building. The Church and its early leaders figured prominently in Alabama's black Baptist history. The church congregation held its services here until 1969.

SIDE 2:  EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH / BAPTIST HILL / EAST THACH AVENUE
Pastors serving church at this site: Reverend Tom Glynn Reverend Ishman Pollard Reverend I. T. Simpson Reverend C. J. Davis Reverend H. E. Jones Reverend Saunders Reverend O.D. Slaughter Reverend J. M. Alexander Reverend G. R. Young, Jr.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978

9. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH
 
Location: 800 1st Avenue, Opelika, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 6, 2004
Marker Text: 
Organized in 1858, Trinity Mission was admitted to the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama on May 5, 1860. When the first church was consecrated on this site in 1862, it was renamed Emmanuel, meaning "God With Us." That building was destroyed by a tornado in 1869. The cornerstone for the present church was laid on Easter Day 1872. Built of native fieldstone from the Nelson and Sarah Carruthers Clayton Plantation north of Opelika, Emmanuel is the oldest public building in Opelika. Born of hope during Reconstruction, this little stone church stands as a testament to pioneer faith and endurance and remains a living monument to the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Opelika Historical Preservation and Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 2004.

10. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Location: Located at 702 Avenue A, Opelika, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1987
Marker Text: 
Established as the first religious organization in the area in 1836 with 22 members as Labanon Methodist Episcopal Church, around which the village of Opelika developed. Moved to present location in 1879 as Opelika Station, Montgomery District, Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Red brick steepled building completed in 1881. Renamed "First Methodist Episcopal Church, South of Opelika" by Quarterly Conference in 1905. Remodeled in 1909 to present Classical Revival style characterized by fluted columns, Corinthians capitals and sanctuary dome. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Opelika First United Methodist Church, 1987.

11. GENERAL JAMES HENRY LANE HOUSE/WOMAN’S CLUB OF AUBURN
 
Location: Located at the corner of Thach & College Street, Auburn, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 8, 1992
Marker Text: 
The Lane House, built in 1853 at the corner of Thach and College Street, was home to several Auburn University notables. E. T. Glenn, Treasurer, leased it in 1873. General James H. Lane, Aide to General Stonewall Jackson and Head of Engineering, purchased the house in 1884. Daughter Mary married Dean George Petrie, author of the Auburn Creed. Daughter Kate Meade Lane was the last resident. Mollie Hollifield Jones purchased the house in 1960 for the Woman's Club. The house was moved to its present location in 1962. It was placed on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in 1991.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Women’s Club of Auburn, 1992.

12. KILLGORE SCHOLARSHIPS
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1997
SIDE 1:  KILLGORE SCHOLARSHIPS
Here James A. Killgore (1888-1966) and his wife, Ophelia Parker, operated a grocery store from 1916 to 1944. The Killgores worked hard, practiced frugality, and invested money wisely, desiring to help deserving students pursue a college education. The Killgores willed one million, two hundred thousand dollars for a trust fund to provide college scholarships for graduates of Lee County High Schools: Auburn High, Opelika High, Beauregard High, Beulah High, and Smith's Station High. Since 1967, the Killgore Scholarships have assisted hundreds of students with their college education.

Provided by a friend, G. A. "Chief" Mitchell and the Lee County Commission. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1997.

SIDE 2:  SOME TERMS OF SCHOLARSHIPS
Since its beginning over 900 students have received scholarships. The Killgore Scholarships were established to reward students for their efforts and to encourage them to continue their education. Four-year scholarships are awarded annually to students from Auburn, Beauregard, Beulah, Opelika, and Smith's Station High Schools for achieving excellence. Girls receive $750 each year, boys $500. Military service, personal illness or family matters only may interrupt a student’s education funded by these scholarships.

Provided by a friend, G. A. "Chief" Mitchell and the Lee County Commission. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1997.

13. LEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
 
Location: Located on Lee County Courthouse lawn, Opelika, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 19, 1978
SIDE 1:  LEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
Lee County was created from portions of Russell, Macon, Chambers and Tallapoosa by act of the Alabama legislature, approved December 5, 1866. The county's first election was held January 21, 1867. An early courthouse stood across the street from the present structure. In 1896, when W. C. Robinson was Probate Judge, erection of today’s courthouse got underway: low bid, $23, 000; architect’s fee, $1,000; total bond issue, including jail, $35,000. Last bonds paid off in late 1930’s. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places July 23, 1973.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

SIDE 2:  LEE COUNTY PROBATE JUDGES
David Read, January 21, 1867- August 10, 1872 Wilson Williams, August 1872 – 1880 James K. Edwards, 1881- October 20, 1883 Thomas L. Frazer, November 2, 1883 - 1886 William Carlisle Robinson, 1887 – 1898 Frank Monroe Renfro, 1899 – 1904 John B. Lyons, Late 1904 – May 24, 1915 Griffin P. Butler, June 1, 1915 – November 28, 1932 Lum Duke, late 1932 – January 1935 John T. Frazer, January 15, 1935 – January 25, 1949 James Lewis Killian, 1949- 1950 Ira H. Weissinger, Sr., November 11, 1950 – January 17, 1977 I. H. (Hal) Smith, January 18, 1977 –

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

14. LOACHAPOKA HISTORIC DISTRICT
 
Location: Located on Alabama Highway 14 in Loachapoka, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 14, 1978
SIDE 1:  LOACHAPOKA HISTORIC DISTRICT
One of the larger settlements of the Upper Creeks at the time of Indian Removal to the West, 1835-1837. Their last Council Fire was held here before their forced migration to Oklahoma. Pioneer families began pouring in after 1836. Today's cemetery was known as Pine Level; the fist Baptist church was located there. A half mile south was Ball’s Fork, trade center and stagecoach junction. Loachapoka can be interpreted as "land where turtles live," or "turtle killing place."

SIDE 2:  BOOM AND CHANGE
Coming of the railroad from Montgomery in 1845 started a new era, with Loachapoka's name revived. It became the trade center for Waverly, Roxana, Rome, Camp Hill, Dudleyville and Dadeville. Rousseau’s Raiders hit Loachapoka at sundown, Sunday, July 17, 1864, and stayed one day. Census of 1870 indicated a population of 1,254, but Reconstruction, migration, 1873 panic, and railroad extension from Opelika to Dadeville in the early 1870’s destroyed the town’s preeminence. Loachapoka was placed on the National Register of Historic Places, May 11, 1973.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

15. NOBLE HALL
 
Location: Located at 1433 Lee Road 97, 3 miles north of Auburn, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1988
SIDE 1:  NOBLE HALL
Side 1 The Greek Revival rock and mortar house was built by Addison Frazer (1809-1873) between 1852 and 1854 and served as the center for a 2,000 acre cotton plantation. Frazer owned 100 slaves and was on the Board of Trustees of Auburn Masonic Female College and East Alabama Male College. The contractor from Kentucky used slave labor to build the eight rooms with 12 foot high ceilings and 18 inch exterior walls, two cantilever balconies and eight Doric columns. In the rear are the original separate kitchen, carriage-smokehouse and overseer's house. The Frazer family owned the house until 1922.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Lee County Historical Society, 1988.

SIDE 2:  NOBLE HALL
In 1932, J. V. Brown, Head of Buildings and Grounds at Alabama Polytechnic Institute, now Auburn University, bought the house and began restoration. In 1941, he sold it and 251 acres to Dr. Luther Noble Duncan (1875-1947), who served as president of A.P.I. (1935-1947). In 1943 his daughter, Elizabeth Pearson (Mrs. Allen M.), and family occupied the house and continued restoration. Mrs. Pearson inherited the house in 1951, collected its furnishings and named it Nobel Hall. In 1972 it was the first building in Lee County to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Lee County Historical Society, 1988.

16. PINE HILL CEMETERY
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 2, 1997
SIDE 1:  PINE HILL CEMETERY
Pine Hill was established in 1837 and is the oldest cemetery in Auburn. Judge John J. Harper, Auburn's founder, donated almost six acres to the new town to be used as a community burying ground for white settlers and their slaves. The original part of the cemetery lies to the north and contains the oldest marked grave – 1838. Early cemetery records are non-existent as the fist survey was conducted in the 1950’s when over 1,100 marked graves were cataloged. Of this number, only one black grave is identified. A cross section of Auburn Citizens are buried here including University presidents and slaves.

Erected by the Auburn Heritage Association and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1995.

SIDE 2:  PINE HILL CEMETERY
In the 1870's a separate cemetery, Baptist Hill, opened to the southeast. For decades Pine Hill served as the primary burying ground for whites in the area. The city’s Confederate marker rises at the rear of the cemetery over the common graves of 98 Texas soldiers who died in a temporary hospital housed in a college building known as "The Main." Pine Hill suffered from vandalism and neglect until 1995 when the Auburn Heritage Association launched a restoration of the cemetery. It was placed on the Alabama Register in 1978 and is owned and maintained by the City of Auburn. Erected by the Auburn Heritage Association and Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1995.

17. RAILROAD AVENUE, HISTORIC DISTRICT OPELIKA, ALABAMA
 
Location: Located at South Railroad Avenue, Opelika, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 25, 1989
SIDE 1:  RAILROAD AVENUE, HISTORIC DISTRICT OPELIKA, ALABAMA
The Railroad Avenue Historic District was the downtown nucleus of Opelika when the city was incorporated as part of Russell County, Alabama in February, 1854. The city limits extended a mile in every direction from the Montgomery and West Point Railway Station. In 1864 another railroad was built from Opelika to Columbus, thus establishing the city as a transportation center. During 1864 and 1865, Opelika's government supply warehouses, its dept, rolling stock and railroad were a target of Federal raiders Rousseau and Wilson. Train service from Atlanta to Montgomery was re-established in 1865.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Opelika Historic Preservation Society, 1985.

SIDE 2:  RAILROAD AVENUE, HISTORIC DISTRICT OPELIKA, ALABAMA
When Lee County was established on December 5, 1866, Opelika became its county seat. The commercial district, a collection of wooden buildings, was destroyed by fire in 1868. The physical rebuilding of the district began during the 1870's. The Railroad Avenue Historic District is composed of 105 buildings which date primarily from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It contains the major commercial and political structures in the city. The District was accepted for placement on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Opelika Historic Preservation Society, 1985.

18. ROBERT WILTON BURTON
 
Location: Located in front of Burton House Apartments on East Magnolia, in Auburn, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1999
SIDE 1:  ROBERT WILTON BURTON 1848-1917
Near this site once stood "Four-Story Cottage," the home of Robert Wilton Burton. A one-story house with wide porch and bay window, Burton built it in 1885 with proceeds from the sale of four stories to children's magazines. Born in Camden County, Georgia, Burton grew up in Lafayette, Alabama, where he began writing stories for the newspaper, on various subjects. In the early 1870’s, with his brother, he opened a bookstore in Opelika, Alabama. In 1878, at the request of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, Burton opened the first bookstore in Auburn. It was soon known as the "Coffee House of the College City."

Erected by the Auburn Heritage Association and Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

SIDE 2:  ROBERT WILTON BURTON
Burton wrote numerous local color stories for national magazines and newspapers. Many of his best tales, in Negro dialect, feature "Marengo Jake" Mitchell, a former slave in Auburn known for his tall tales. In 1991, these stories were published as “De Remnant Truth.” An active Presbyterian, Burton also served as Secretary of the Town Board of Education, County School Superintendent, Clerk of the Town Council, and Secretary to the College Board of Trustees. His bookstore was sold in 1968; his home dismantled in 1993. Erected by the Auburn Heritage Association and Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

19. ROSSEAU’S RAID TO EAST ALALBAMA
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2000
Marker Text: 
With orders from General Sherman, General Lovell Rousseau left Decatur with 2,700 cavalry, beginning his raid into East-Central Alabama. Their raid ended successfully in Opelika July 19, 1864, after miles of track were destroyed along with other railroad equipment, two depots, and several warehouses brimming with supplies for Confederate forces defending Atlanta. They then turned northeast to join Sherman's Army advancing towards Atlanta.

Erected by The Opelika Historic Preservation Society and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2000.

20. SALEM, ALABAMA FOUNDED 1835
 
Location: Located in front of Salem United Methodist Church on U.S. Highway 280-431, Salem, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 9, 1980
SIDE 1:  SALEM, ALABAMA FOUNDED 1835
Among the earliest settlers were the families of Henry Crowder, Dr. D. W. Floyd, Charles Nelms, W. W. Burt, George Heard, John Askew, Moses Pruitt, and Dr. McCoy. Reverend F. L. Cherry, leading historian of east Alabama's first 50 years, wrote that the town was laid off in 1836 by Benjamin H. Baker, Dr. Erastus Jones and B.S. Mangham. A schoolhouse was built in 1837. Professor Sheppard, the first teacher, was followed by professor Sanders in 1838. Academies for the girls and boys, Baptist and Methodist churches and a camp meeting ground were early additions to the community. A stagecoach stop was located on the west side of town. A "picnic" ground popular for public gatherings probably saw its most exciting day in an 1856 presidential rally. By 1855, railroad service had been established from Salem to Opelika and Columbus, Georgia.

SIDE 2:  SALEM, ALABAMA FOUNDED 1835
Local tradition maintains that a district courthouse was built in Salem to serve upper Russell County. The building still stands. When Lee was created on December 5, 1866, Salem became a part of the new county and received the second highest vote total for seat of government. The first three Lee County probate judges came from old Russell County. Two and one-half miles east of this site is Wacoochee Covered Bridge, the last remaining "kissin'" bridge in Lee county and one of a very few found in Alabama. This one span, 75 foot, Town Lattice Bridge was built no later than between 1865 and 1880. It has been fully restored by the Lee County Commission.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Lee County Historical Society, 1979.

21. SCOTT-YARBROUGH HOUSE
 
Location: Located at 101 Debardeleben Street, Auburn, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 10, 1978
SIDE 1:  SCOTT-YARBROUGH HOUSE
Home of Nathaniel J. Scott Family 1847-1871. Colonel Nathaniel J. Scott, from Harris County Georgia, and brother-in-law of John J. Harper (1807-1863), founder of Auburn, Alabama, built this house, which he called "Pebble Hill," on 100 acres at this site in 1847. With its pyramidal roof and symmetrical lines, the frame house reflects the Greek Revival architecture popular at the time. Colonel Scott was one of four commissioners appointed to lay out and manage the town of Auburn. He organized the East Alabama Masonic Female College in 1847. In 1856, he led in the establishment of East Alabama Male College, now Auburn University. Colonel Scott was Auburn's first State Legislator.

SIDE 2:  SCOTT-YARBROUGH HOUSE
Owned by Dr. Cecil Yarbrough Family 1912-1974. "Pebble Hill" was purchased in 1912 by Dr. Cecil S. Yarbrough (1878 -1940) for his family home. Dr. Yarbrough served in the Alabama State Legislature in the 1920's. He served three times as Mayor of Auburn, in 1918, in 1921-22 and from 1936-44. He was college physician during World War II. The Auburn Heritage Association purchased the House in 1974. The raised cottage rests on a brick foundation. The joists and rafters are pegged. The floors are hand hewn heart pine. Owners between 1871-1912: Ray, Hollifield, Riley, Hodges.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1978.

22. SHADY GROVE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 10, 1996
Marker Text: 
Organized November 15, 1846, as the Church of Christ at Shady Grove, under the New Covenant of 2nd Corinthians, 3rd chapter, agreeing to believe all the New Testament teaches, and to obey all its injunctions to best of their capacity and submit to the Laws of Jesus Christ, the Head of the Church in all things. Signed by 51 charter members, William P. Allen, as moderator and D. G. Reeves as clerk. The sanctuary was built circa 1890. Circa 1910, a baptistery was constructed across the road; water being supplied from a nearby spring.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Shady Grove Christian Church, 1996.

23. THE BAUGHMAN-HONOUR-STILES HOUSE
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2001
Marker Text: 
Designed by William Dryden Baughman and built by Fred Burk in 1929, the house was not finished due to the Great Depression. Because of its two-story turret and French Norman Style, it became known as "The Castle." In 1949, the home was sold to architect Wilfred M. Honour. In 1996, Warren and Mary Ann Stiles purchased it and restored the original heart pine wood floors, gothic archways, wrought iron fixtures and French millwork. They completed the unfinished tower room and the entire second story.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 2001.

24. WITTEL DORMITORY
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1999
Marker Text: 
Wittel Dormitory has long been admired as one of Auburn's most significant examples of classic nineteenth-century design. Built in the early 1900’s by Samuel S. Wittel to house professional women, it also served as a home for three generations of the Wittel family. After World War II enrollment at the Polytechnic Institute, which is now Auburn University, rose dramatically and Wittel became Auburn’s first dormitory for college women. The original structure features copper roof details, wood floors throughout, silver plate applied to the front entrance ceilings and Auburn’s first elevator.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1999.

25. WORLD WAR II PRISONER OF WAR FACILITY
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 11, 2002
Marker Text: 
Located on this 800 acre site was an enemy prisoner of war camp. Construction of Camp Opelika began in September 1942. The first prisoners, -9captured by the British, were part of General Erwin Rommel's Africa Corps. The camp prisoner population was maintained at about 3000 until the end of World War II, in May 1945. In September 1945, the camp was deactivated and deeded to the City of Opelika. For a brief period the camp quarters were used for veteran's housing before the site became an industrial park.

Erected by the Opelika Historic Preservation Society and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2002.

26. WRIGHT’S MILL
 
Location: Located at the entrance of Chewacla State Park, four miles south of Auburn, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 18, 1979
SIDE 1:  WRIGHT’S MILL
A popular recreation area for more than 100 years. Original dam located a short distance below Chewacla Lake Dam. Mill located on the west bank and ground both corn and wheat. Earlier mill owners from 1840's were Echols, Hiram Reed, Charles Nelms, and John F. Lewis. W.W. Wright (1825 – 1905) owned the mill from about 1873 into early 1900’s when it was abandoned. Most of these years his miller was Joe Broome. Just before Town Creek enters the Chewacla is the Gin-Saw Hole. A water powered gin and sawmill were located here in the 1840’s. For many years it was a very popular swimming hole.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1979.

SIDE 2:  WRIGHT’S MILL
In early 1890's a club house was built on the hill between Wright’s Mill and the Gin-Saw Hole. This was a favorite are for Auburnites before Town Creek was contaminated by Auburn Sewage. A bicycle club was formed in Auburn circa 1900. George Petrie and B. B. Ross were prominent members. A bicycle path was constructed from Auburn to Wright’s Mill. It began where Gay Street formerly terminated at Samford Avenue following the east bank of Town Creek much of the way. Chewacla State Park was opened in 1939 and this park included the Wright’s Mill area.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Auburn Heritage Association, 1979.

Russell County, Alabama»
1. ALLEN TEMPLE A.M.E. CHURCH
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1997
SIDE 1:  ALLEN TEMPLE A.M.E. CHURCH
In 1879, under the pastorate of Reverend George Wesley Allen, the Allen Temple African Methodist Episcopal Church had its humble beginning in Phenix City, Alabama as Grant Mission. The Russell County Housing Authority's renewal project of 1940 caused the relocation of the congregation. Under the administration of Reverend E.W. Cook, in 1941, the new church was built and renamed Allen Temple A.M.E. Church. The Church has continued to serve the needs of its congregation and community under the leadership of its present pastor, Reverend Samuel Thomas.

Erected by The Allen Temple A.M.E. Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1997.

SIDE 2:  GRANT CHAPEL A.M.E. CHURCH
Church services at Grant Mission, forerunner of Allen Temple A.M.E., were orginally held in a small framed house along the Central of Georgia Railroad on South Railroad Street. Both Grant and St. Peter Missions were organized by G. W. Allen in 1879. St. Peter's Church, built in 1881, was destroyed by a storm resulting in its merger with Grant Chapel in 1908. The merged membership elected to retain the Grant Chapel A.M.E. designation. In 1919 Grant Chapel A.M.E. was remodeled under the pastorate of Reverend M.J. Jackson. "PRAISE BE TO GOD FROM WHOM ALL BLESSINGS FLOW."

Erected by The Allen Temple A.M.E. Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1997.

2. ANCIENT FISHERIES
 
Location: Phenix City Riverwalk, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
To the native people of the Chattahoochee River Valley, the Creek or Muskogulgi Indians, the shoals of the river were a source of recreation and food. In the spring, the women and children of Coweta Town came here to fish, using dip nets, spears, bows and arrows and cleverly designed fish traps to harvest shad, bass, catfish and sunfish. Creek boys lassoed the tails of huge sturgeon and wrestled them ashore. Natives from Cusseta Town had a fishery on the Georgia side of the river opposite this spot. The Creeks and their neighbors, the Yuchi, were forcibly removed to the West in the 1830s.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

3. ASBURY SCHOOL AND MISSION 1 Mile North of Fort Mitchell
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 165 at the entrance to the Fort Mitchell Park adjacent to the Fort Mitchell National Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1984
Marker Text: 
In September 1821, Reverend William Capers was sent to Fort Mitchell, by the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to negotiate with the chiefs of the Creek Indian Nations for a mission which would teach their children reading, writing and other white-man skills. In 1822 Asbury Manual Labor School was established with Reverend Isaac Smith, Superintendent; 33 resident students; 3 teachers; houses; school; and farm. The school closed in 1830 following the removal to the West of a portion of the Creek Tribe. The Asbury Mission site was designated a United Methodist Landmark in 1984.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Alexandria UMC and the AWF Conference 1984.

4. BATTLE OF GIRARD
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1990
SIDE 1:  BATTLE OF GIRARD
The decisive action in the last battle of the War Between the States occurred here at the center of the Confederate defensive line. At 8 p.m. on April 16, 1865 Union forces led by Major General James H. Wilson charged in the darkness from the hills to the west. They broke through the defense and pushed on to the wooden covered bridge across the river. The Confederates, believing they been cut off by the Federals, made a wild dash for the bridge also. There was utter chaos as both armies in pitch darkness, jammed the narrow structure with men, horses and wagons. In the dark, friend and foe were indistinguishable.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission, 1990.

SIDE 2:  BEFORE THE BATTLE
All day that Easter Sunday the Confederate forces commanded by Colonel Leon von Zinken awaited the Union army they know was on the way from Tuskegee. Lacking the men needed to hold it, they were forced to leave the line they had prepared on the hills to the west and man an inner line from the mouth of Holland Creek northward through this position. Left undefended, the Dillingham street bridge was packed with oil-soaked cotton waste and burned about 2 o'clock when Federal van-guard attacked it. Failing in their effort, the raiders withdrew behind the hills until they attacked after dark.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission, 1990.

5. CONFEDERATE FORT
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1988
Marker Text: 
On the hill to the northwest is an earthen fortification built in 1863 as part of the defenses on the Confederate navy yard, iron works and other war-related industries in nearby Columbus, Georgia. Designated Fort #5 on the plan done by the CSA engineers, the well-preserved fort has three cannon emplacements. It is pentagonal, of 90 foot side. Escarpments are 30 feet. Trenches flank the central unit. During the attack by Federal troops under Major General James H. Wilson on April 16, 1865, the fort and other outer defenses were no manned due to lack of Confederate manpower.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission, 1988.

6. CONFEDERATES SET FIRE TO LOWER BRIDGE
 
Location: Phenix City, Alabama- Dillingham Street Bridge
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
Early in the afternoon of April 16, 1865 the first major act in the Battle of Girard-Columbus took place. Union General Emory Upton sent the First Ohio cavalry charging down oldCrawford Road to capture the Dillingham Bridge, then known as the lower or wagon bridge. Confederates on the Georgia side had prepared for the Union tactic by removing the bridge's flooring and placing turpentine-soaked cotton along the length of its superstructure. Confederate Colonel C. C. McGehee crawled out on the wooden framework and set it ablaze. When they saw the bridge burst into flame, the First Ohio broke off its all-out charge.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission And the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004

7. COWETA TALLAHASSEE (Kvwetv Tvlvhassee)
 
Location: Brickyard Road, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 2004
Marker Text: 
One of the founding or "mother" towns of the Lower Creeks, Coweta Tallahassee (Coweta Tribal or Old Town), located on the Chattahoochee River to the east, was a red or war town. Spain, England, and to a lesser extent, France, competed for its allegiance. The English trader and adventurer Henry Woodward reached the town in 1685, but the Spanish had preceded him by many years. The Spanish burned the town near the end of the 17th century, after which the Cowetans moved to the Ocmulgee River to the east. At the end of the disastrous Yamassee War in 1715, the townspeople returned to the Chattahoochee to found New Coweta a few miles upriver.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

8. COWETA TOWN (KVWETV)
 
Location: Brickyard Road, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
Coweta Town, located east of this marker on the banks of the Chattahoochee River, is sometimes called New or Upper Coweta to distinguish it from its predecessor, Coweta Tallahassee, down river. Among other well-known Creeks, Coweta was the birthplace of William McIntosh, the controversial half-blood who was executed by his own people for having signed the fraudulent 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs. Mary Musgrove, who was such a help to James Edward Oglethorpe and the Savannah colony in Georgia, claimed Coweta ancestry. Oglethorpe visited Coweta in 1739 and negotiated an important treaty here and across the river in Cusseta Town.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

9. CROCKETTSVILLE - CRAWFORD, ALABAMA
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 80 on the grounds of the Crawford United Methodist Church, Crawford, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 1986
SIDE 1:  CROCKETTSVILLE - CRAWFORD, ALABAMA
The community of Crockettsville was settled at about the time Russell County was formed in 1832. Among the first settlers were Jerry Sagar and Green Sewell. It was named in honor of David "Davy" Crockett who served as a scout in Andrew Jackson's Tennessee Militia at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814. The name of the city was changed to Crawford in 1843 by Act of the Alabama Legislature. This was done to honor the family of William Harris Crawford (1772-1834), a distinguished Georgia teacher, lawyer, duelist and statesman. The city served as the seat of government for Russell County from 1833 to 1868.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1986.

SIDE 2:  CROCKETTSVILLE - CRAWFORD, ALABAMA
S. H. Baldwin laid out Crockettsville in 1840, complete with lots and streets. The city limits extended about one-half mile in every direction from the courthouse which stood facing east on the present site of Crawford United Methodist Church. The jail was across the street to the east. "Golgotha Hill," located one-half mile north of the city and east of the cemetery, was the site of executions by hanging. Crawford Masonic Lodge no. 863, F & M (originally Tuckabatchee No. 96), across the road to the south, was built in 1848 and served intermittently for Lodge meetings, school classes and church services.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1986.

10. FORT MITCHELL MILITARY CEMETERY
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1986
Marker Text: 
This military graveyard was established soon after Fort Mitchell was built by General John Floyd of the Georgia Militia. Located just south of the stockade, the cemetery was used between 1813 and 1840 during the fort's occupation be Georgia and United States soldiers. The first burial was that of John Ward, an interpreter on the staff of General Floyd. Ward died of pneumonia in November 1813. A line of approximately 25 soldiers’ graves is located adjacent to the site of the fort’s dispensary. A burial ground for area residents is situated on higher ground just to the south. The Yuchi leader, Timpoochee Barnard, is said to be interred nearby.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Fort Mitchell Historical Society 1986.

11. FRANCHISE BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Location: Located At: 1000 Dillingham Street Phenix City, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 24, 2002
SIDE 1:  Franchise Baptist Church
This church was organized in 1852 under a brush arbor on the banks of the Chattahoochee River. Members also met in Girard Baptist Church when the noise from riverboats interfered with worship services. Land was later donated for a "colored" church and school which was called their "franchise." After the adjacent Central Girard Elementary School burned in 1956, the church purchased the vacant property. Pastors from 1852-2001 are: Stone, A.E. Meyers, A.W. Snowden, R.T. James, S.A. Harvey, and M. Wiggins, and Raymond Cochran, Sr.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Franchise Missionary Baptist Church, 2001.

SIDE 2:  Central Girard Colored School
Established in 1897, Central Girard School was the first facility constructed for "colored" children in Phenix City. It was a four-room wooden building located on Church Avenue between Dillingham and Gale Street. Pricipals included G.W. Allen, 1897-1905; A. A. Peters, 1905-1923; J.M. Brown, 1923-1944; L.N. Randolph, 1944-1957; and Clarence Bibb, 1957. The first superintendent was L. P. Stough who served from 1923-1955. The school was remodeled in 1943 and burned in 1956.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Franchise Missionary Baptist Church, 2002.

12. GLENNVILLE
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1980
SIDE 1: 
One of the earliest white settlements in the Old Creek Indian Nation. James Elizabeth Glenn, who named the town, and his brother Thompson Glenn, arrived here in 1835 only to have to evacuate during the Indian uprisings of 1836, at which time all buildings were destroyed and the remaining settlers killed. Thompson Glenn is credited with effecting the removal, to Columbus Georgia, of the entrapped white citizens of nearby Roanoke, Georgia, during the same uprising. Glennville was resettled upon the removal of the Indians. It rapidly attracted settlers and their social and cultural standards caused Glennville to be known as "The Athens of the South."

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

Located thirteen miles south of Seale on U.S. Highway 431, Glennville, Alabama.

SIDE 2:  GLENNVILLE
At its apex this town had collegiate institutes, finishing schools, a military academy, classic churches and stately homes. In 1854 John Bowles Glenn left here to establish a school at Auburn and became its first president of the board of trustees. This school in successive changes became Auburn University. Glennville was the home of the only known lynch mob that bought a newspaper advertisement, acknowledged the deed and published their names. The victim, a convicted murderer, was a member of a prominent Barbour county white family. The incidents brought national attention to the town. The failure to accept a railroad, seen as "an intrusion on their way of living," proved to be the herald of the town's demise.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

Located thirteen miles south of Seale on U.S. Highway 431, Glennville, Alabama.

13. HOLLAND McTYEIRE SMITH
 
Location: Located on Russell County 18, just off U.S. Highway 431 in Seale, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1980
SIDE 1: 
South of this site was the homeplace of Holland McTyeire Smith, born April 20, 1882. He completed the preparatory school at Seale, College at Alabama Polytechnic Institute and the University of Alabama Law School. He was commissioned Lieutenant in the Marine Corps in 1915; Brigadier General, 1939; Major General, 1941; Lieutenant General 1944; and General, 1946. During his tenure he was the highest ranked general in the Marine Corps. He participated in numerous campaigns and was acknowledged as the "Father of Amphibious Warfare." Smith was best known fro his brilliant command of major battle in the Pacific during World War II, including Iwo Jima.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

SIDE 2: 
Among General Smith's decorations were: Meritorious Service Citation from the Commander-In-Chief; French Croix de Guerre with Palm; Four Distinguished Service Medals; Purple Heart; Expeditionary Medal with Three Bronze Stars; Mexican Service Medal; Victory Medal-Aisne-Saint Mihiel-Muese-Argonne Clasp; Dominican Republic Medal; Dominican Order of the First Merit; The British Order of Commander of the Bath; Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Ribbon with Five Stars. He was the son of John V. and Cornelia McTyeire Smith. His father, a Confederate veteran, held many County offices, rising to the presidency of the Alabama Railroad Commission. General Smith died January 12, 1967, and is interred at Fort Rosencrans, California.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

14. HORACE KING
 
Location: Located at the corner of Dillingham and Broad Streets, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 22, 1979
Marker Text: 
Side 1

Born September 8, 1807, near Cheraw, South Carolina. Of African and American Indian ancestry. Slave of John Godwin, bridge builder. Supervised first Dillingham Street Bridge, 1832-1833. Freed by act of Alabama Legislature, 1846. Member Alabama House of Representatives, 1869-1872. Successful contractor-builder in Chattahoochee Valley. Died in LaGrange, Georgia, May 27, 1887.

Side 2 Horace King, a slave of John Godwin, was construction foreman for the first Dillingham Street Bridge in 1832, when he and Godwin introduced the "Town Lattice" bridge design into the Chattahoochee Valley . King built most of the early wooden bridges spanning the river, including those at West Point, Eufaula, and Fort Gaines-Franklin. After Godwin's death in 1859, he raised a monument inscribed: "In lasting remembrance of the love and gratitude felt for this lost friend and former master."

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1979.

Dedication date: 4-22-1979

15. HURTSBORO UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Location: Located in front of the Hurtsboro United Methodist Church, Front Street, Hurtsboro, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1994
Marker Text: 
Originally built in 1865, the First Methodist Church in Hurtsboro, then called Hurtsville was located in Olivet, about 4 miles south. The building burned and a wooden church was built on this site in 1876. It was replaced in 1906 by the present brick building during the pastorate of Reverend W.S. Street. In 1947 a Sunday School Annex was added. The church is a significant landmark, as its beauty and stained glass windows are well known throughout the Alabama-West Florida Conference.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Hurstboro United Methodist Church, 1994.

16. INDIAN BALL GROUND
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 165, Fort Mitchell, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1996
Marker Text: 
The most popular game among the Indians of the region was 'stick ball.' This field has been constructed so that the game may be enjoyed again in the Chattahoochee Valley where it was played for hundreds of years. Sometimes known as "little brother to war," the game was played with an intensity second only to war. Hand crafted sticks with small loops on the end were used to catch and throw a small deer skin ball often filled with squirrel fur to make it "lively." One of the games played here in the valley was viewed by General Lafayette when he visited Fort Mitchell in 1825.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Chattahoochee Indian Heritage Association, 1996.

17. JAMES CANTEY
 
Location: Located on Alabama Highway 165, eight miles south of Phenix City, Alabama, at Fort Mitchell.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1890
SIDE 1: 
Near here was the home of Confederate Brigadier General James Cantey who arrived in 1849 to operate a plantation owned by his father. Prior to coming to Russell County he had practiced law at his birthplace, Camden, South Carolina, and had represented his district in the State Legislature thee for two terms. Cantey fought in the Mexican War and received near mortal wounds. He was left among the dead but was rescued by his body servant whose plans were to bear him home for burial. The slave's detection of a faint sign of life caused heroic action that revived his master. For this deed the servant was offered his freedom, which was refused.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

SIDE 2:  JAMES CANTEY
General Cantey was married in 1858 at Fort Mitchell to Mary Elizabeth Benton, niece of Colonel John Crowell, Alabama's first Congressman. At the beginning of the War Between the States he organized "Cantey’s Rifles" in what was then the 15th Alabama Regiment. He served throughout the War and surrendered with Joseph E. Johnston at Durham Station, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. The first chapter of the United Daughters of the confederacy in Russell County, organized at Seale, was named in his honor. General Cantey was born December 30, 1818, and died June 30, 1874. He is interred in a family cemetery at Fort Mitchell.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

18. JOHN BACON McDONALD
 
Location: Located just off U.S. Highway 431, behind St. Matthews Episcopal Church on Longview Street, Seale, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1979
SIDE 1: 
Near here is the site of the plantation of John Bacon McDonald who was born February 8, 1859. He entered the United States Military Academy on June 14, 1876, after finishing the tutelage of Colonel John M. Brannon of Seale and Captain Jerry J. Slade of Columbus. On June 11, 1881, he was graduated from West Point. He served in the Geronimo Campaign in 1885 and as an Indian Scout; the Philippines; and later Europe during World War I. In 1923 he was promoted to Brigadier General.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1979.

SIDE 2:  JOHN BACON McDONALD
General McDonald received the following decorations: Distinguished Service Cross; Distinguished Service Medal, by the United States; Croix de Guerre (with palm) by France; Croix de Guerre by Belgium; and War Cross by Italy. He was the son of Joseph Bibb and Henrietta Alston McDonald. His father, active in the Confederate cause, was a prominent member of the Seale Bar, of which a state historian wrote, "Illumined the pages of the legal profession in Alabama." General McDonald died in Washington, D.C., on March 15, 1926. He was buried from St. John's Episcopal Church and interred at Arlington.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1979.

19. JOHN CROWELL
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 165 at the entrance to the Fort Mitchell Park adjacent to the Fort Mitchell National Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1984
SIDE 1:  JOHN CROWELL
Near here is the site where John Crowell lived, died, and is interred. Colonel Crowell was born in Halifax County, North Carolina, on September 18, 1780;moved to Alabama in 1815, having been appointed as Agent of the United States to the Muscogee Indians. In 1817, he was elected as Alabama's first and only Territorial Delegate to the 15th Congress, where he served from January 29, 1818, until March 3, 1819. Upon Alabama’s admission as a State, he was elected it first Congressman.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1984

SIDE 2:  JOHN CROWELL
Served in the 16th Congress from December 14, 181p, until March 3, 1821; then appointed Agent for the Creek Indian Confederacy, which encompassed West Georgia and East Alabama, until the Indians were moved West in 1836. Thereafter, he was nationally known for his race horses, one of which "John Bascomb" was walked from here to Long Island, New York, where on May 5, 1836, on Union Course; he won the prestigious “South Against the North Race.” Colonel Crowell died June 25, 1846, and is interred on his plantation.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1984.

20. MACEDONIA MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 12, 1999
SIDE 1:  MACEDONIA MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
Macedonia Baptist Church was organized in 1870 by Pastor Robert Fegins with the assistance of twelve members from Providence Baptist Church. The first person baptized in the church was Mr. Charles Smith who later became Sunday school superintendent. He became assistant pastor of the church in which capacity he served until his death in 1922. Following the remodeling of the church in 1990 it was resolved that the name be changed to Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church.

Erected by The Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

SIDE 2:  MACEDONIA SCHOOL
Macedonia School was established early in the twentieth century. The one-room frame building was heated by a pot-bellied stove and had no water or electricity. Mrs. Matilda McCoy was the school's first known teacher. On November 16, 1917, Mr. B. G. Jenning, chairman of Russell County Board of Education, authorized a three-month per year contract for a teacher at $25 per month. The contract was approved January 1, 1918. Mr. William H. Person, the second teacher, was responsible for securing electricity for the school in the late 1940’s.

Erected by the Russell County African American Historical Preservation Society, Inc. and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

21. MITCHELL-FERRELL-POWELL HOUSE
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 1988
Marker Text: 
Built in Glennville, Alabama by slave artisans in the early 1840's for James Billingslea and Rebecca Stone Mitchell. Moved by ox-cart and reassembled by free citizens at the present site in 1867 or 1869. Purchased in 1895 by Hugh Bennett and Jessie Elvira Screws Ferrell. Purchased and restored in 1978 by Vernon H. and Minnie D. Powell.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Ferrell Family, 1988.

22. MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 165, Fort Mitchell, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1998
Marker Text: 
This church was organized in 1877 by Brothers Robert Anderson, Sr., Manuel Edmond and Robert Fluellen. The first services were conducted by Reverend D.L. Griffin under a brush arbor on the Flournoy Plantation. During Griffin's pastorate Anderson, Edmond and Fluellen were named deacons and the church moved to Mt. Olive School. A new wood frame building was dedicated on May 2, 1897 under the leadership of Reverend L. F. O'Bryan. Members worshipped here until the Flournoy Plantation was sold to the Bickerstaff's who donated five acres of land on the condition that the church relocate to its present site. This was accomplished in 1947 by the Reverend Henry Harris. In 1964 and 1993 the church building was renovated.

Erected by the Mount Olive Baptist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1998.

23. NIMROD LONG HOUSE
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2002
Marker Text: 
Nimrod Washington Long moved to Alabama from Georgia in the 1830s. A planter, mill owner and state legislator, he had real estate and railroad interests in Russell County. This house was the plantation home of Nimrod Washington Long in Spring Hill, Barbour County. In 1875, his son, Nimrod William Ezekiel Long(1834-1923), had the house dismantled, the pieces numbered, transported by ox cart and reassembled on this site. Nimrod William Ezekiel Long was a civil engineer, Confederate veteran, planter and merchant who lived here until his death. The house is an example of Greek Revival architecture.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Descendants of Nimrod Washington Long 2002

24. OLD RUSSELL COUNTY COURTHOUSE
 
Location: Located off of US 431, Seale, Alabama, in front of the courthouse.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1984
SIDE 1:  OLD RUSSELL COUNTY COURTHOUSE
During the Federal occupation of the former Confederate States of American, the Alabama Legislature created Lee County primarily from the northern half of Russell County in 1866 and ordered the selection of the county seat "more centrally located." Government in Russell County was practically non-existent at the time; few records were kept and taxes levied only for favored political purposes. An election was called; Seale won. Simeon O'Neal and Cicero McBride selected this commanding site. John Lewis was architect.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Courthouse Association 1984.

SIDE 2:  RUSSELL COUNTY COURTHOUSE
Political opportunists kept confusion reigning; another election was held in 1868; Seale won; excavation began; records were removed from the former county seat at Crawford to a nearby store until rooms were sufficiently complete. Permanent funding was not enacted until 1871, the total cost being $9,600. Simeon O'Neal was the contractor. The wing rooms, the inside chairs, and the exterior rebricking was accomplished in 1908. In 1935 the branch at Phenix City was elected the county seat with Seale remaining a branch until it was closed in 1943.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Courthouse Association 1984.

25. PILGRIM HILL SCHOOL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 2, 2003
Marker Text: 
About 1919, the Russell County Board of Education acquired this property from Job United of America and established a community school, with classes for grades one through six, for colored children. The last teacher to teach in the one room school was Mrs. Caroline Stone. In 1954, when a second room was added to the school, Mrs. Katie McCoy Mitchell became the first teacher-principal. Among the teachers who served this school were: Mrs. Birlee J. McIntyre, Mrs. Marvin Dudley, Mrs. Pearlee Stephens, Mrs. Sarah Fegan and Mrs. Maggie Neal Williams. The school closed on May 29, 1964, with the students being reassignedto Mount Olive School.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission And the Russell County African American Historical Preservation Society, Inc. 2003

26. RED HILL BATTERIES
 
Location: Phenix City, Alabama-West Court House Lawn.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
On April 16, 1865 the batteries of Confederate Major James Fleming Waddell of Seale, Alabama were positioned on the crest of this hill. Union forces under the command of Brevet Major General James H. Wilson were expected to launch a daylight attack from the west down old Broadnax Street, now 14th Street. Instead, the First Ohio first attacked down the Crawford Road in an attempt to capture the lower or wagon bridge, now the Dillingham Street Bridge. Although the Confederate position on Red Hill was heavily defended, it ultimately fell to the enemy during a night attack that developed from the north out Summerville Road.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission And the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

27. SAND FORT
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1988
SIDE 1:  SAND FORT
Nearby by was the Sand Fort, built by the Georgia militia in 1814 and used by U.S. Troops in 1836. Strategically located on the Federal Road, it served as a defense against the uprisings of the Creek Indians and protected Royston's Inn, a stop on the road. By 1841 a post office was established with Robert Allen as postmaster. The community and nearby area prospered and in 1850 included home of the Gallups, Chadwick, and Bush families. The post office closed in 1866 and the community declined due to the social and economic changes of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1988.

SIDE 2:  SITE OF ROYSTON’S INN
As early as 1830 one Mr. Royston operated a tavern on the Federal Road near here. Besieged during the 1836 hostilities, Royston defended his inn alone. He was so closely watched that he could not get water from a nearby spring. He had none to drink or to make bread from the meal of which he had plenty. Royston did, however, have a keg of whiskey. The legend was repeated long afterward that he used the whiskey both to drink and to mix the corn bread on which he subsisted for almost two weeks until the siege was over.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1988.

28. SEALE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1993
SIDE 1:  SEALE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
The Methodist Congregation, of which the church as Seale was organized in 1842, were pioneer families with a deep faith in God and a clear vision of the future. This group centered around a small meeting place and a schoolhouse located on the north side of the Federal Road about 12 miles west of the Chattahoochee River. This church was called Glenn Chapel, a memorial to the old preacher, James E. Glenn. The preaching place, a sort of community center, was established near the home of Sterling Bass. The schoolhouse faced the east and Glenn Chapel west, at what was known as the Sterling Bass Cemetery.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Seale United Methodist Church, 1993.

SIDE 2:  SEALE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
The Church was dismantled and the congregation moved to Silver Run in 1866, which date is the official one for the establishment of the Seale Church. The Church, originally built at Silver Run, was not on the present site, but was within the enclosure of the present cemetery. The present Methodist Church was built about 1876. In 1949, three Sunday School rooms were added and a later expansion included classrooms, restrooms, kitchen and fellowship hall. The sanctuary was remodeled in 1962. On December 6, 1992, the Church's 150th Anniversary was celebrated and in June 1993, it received the Heritage Award at Annual Conference.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Seale United Methodist Church, 1993.

29. SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1990
Marker Text: 
The Shiloh Baptist Church was constituted on March 27, 1852. Shortly thereafter, a house of worship was erected on what is now the present church site. The earliest marked grave in the church cemetery bears the date of 1854. A new building was constructed in 1876 and is currently being used for Sunday school rooms and a fellowship hall. At that time, the church was situated on the east side of the road. In 1947 the building was renovated and the entry was changed to face the west side of Russell County 21, which had been re-routed. Classrooms were added in 1947 and the brick sanctuary was completed and dedicated on March 22, 1970.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Shiloh Baptist Church, 1990.

30. SIX INDIANS HANGED
 
Location: Brickyard Road, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
In November 1836, six Creek and Yuchi Indians were hanged near this spot for their role in a last desperate uprising against the frontier whites of Georgia and Alabama. Following decades of provocation from whites anxious to gain control of their lands, a small band of Indians attacked and burned the little hamlet of Roanoke in Stewart County, Georgia, killing many of its inhabitants. They also killed several whites in a raid on a stagecoach a few miles south of here, near the bridge over Yuchi Creek. Eyewitnesses said the Indians died bravely.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

31. SPANISH FORT, 1689-1691
 
Location: Located on U.S. Highway 165 at Holy Trinity, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1986
Marker Text: 
East of here, on the Chattahoochee River, was the "fort among the Apalachicolas," most northern of the Spanish settlement in eastern North America. A palisaded "strong house" built by Captain Enrique Primo de Rivera to check activities of English traders, it was destroyed when the garrison was called to St. Augustine because of a threatened attack by the French. Undisturbed except by natural forces, the ruins remained visible but unrecognized for 250 years. Research by Mark E. Fretwell and a search of the ground by Brother Finbar Ray led to their identification and designation as a National Historic Landmark in 1966.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1986.

32. SUSIE E. ALLEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
 
Location: Located in front of the school on Eleventh Avenue, Phenix City, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1998
Marker Text: 
In 1953 the Phenix City Elementary School for Negroes was constructed during the tenure of L. P. Stough, Phenix City School Superintedent. It was built to accommodate 488 students with 13 classrooms, a multi-purpose room, clinic, library, cafeteria and storage rooms. Miss Susie E. Allen served as principal of the school from 1934 until her death on August 3, 1961. On December 7, 1961 the Phenix City Board of Education voted to change the name to Susie E. Allen Elementary School. A dedication service was held at the school on November 11, 1962 to honor Miss Allen for her outstanding service to the community, nearby cities and the State of Alabama.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County African American Historical Preservation Society, Inc., 1998.

33. THE FIGHT AT THE BRIDGE
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
At around 9 p.m. on Easter Sunday, 1865, the Battle of Girard-Columbus neared its end in a terrible melee at the old 14th Street Bridge, at the time a completely enclosed wooden span. Within the unlit confines of the bridge, soldiers from both armies fought and grappled in total darkness, uncertain whether they fought friend or foe. Confederate artillery men on the Georgia side of the river, with cannon loaded with grapeshot and trained to shoot straight through the bridge, were afraid to fire lest they kill their own comrades. Once Union forces attained the Georgia side of the river, the fight was essentially over.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

Location: 14th Street Bridge, Phenix City, Alabama.

(to be erected soon)

34. THE TIE-SNAKE
 
Location: Phenix City Riverwalk, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
The Creek Indians believed this section of the river was inhabited by a giant Tie-Snake, a mythical monster that snared the unwary and dragged them down into the watery underworld. The Tie-Snake was but one of many strange creatures and natural forces featured in the myths and folk tales of the native people of this region. Among these were the Winds, the Thunder Helper, the Orphan, the Trickster Rabbit, and the Tarbaby. LaGrange lawyer W.O. Tuggle recorded many of these tales in the late 1800s. Joel Chandler Harris read Tuggle's collection, which formed part of the material out of which Harris fashioned his Uncle Remus stories.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

35. U.S. INDIAN AGENCY OF BENJAMIN HAWKINS
 
Location: Brickyard Road, Phenix City, Alabama
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
For several years after he was made Principal Agent to the Indians South of the Ohio in 1796, Benjamin Hawkins, friend of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, located his agency to the Lower Creeks at Coweta Tallahassee. Here Hawkins began to implement an ambitious "civilization" plan designed to make farmers, stockmen and weavers out of the Creek and Yuchi people. Hawkins had "a garden well cultivated and planted, with a great variety of vegetables, fruits and vines, and an orchard of peach trees." He also raised aromatic herbs. Hawkins moved his headquarters from the Chattahoochee to the Flint River in 1799. He died there in 1816.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

36. UCHEE
 
Location: Located fourteen miles west of Seale on Russell County Road 22, Uchee, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1980
SIDE 1: 
One of the oldest white settlements in the Chattahoochee Valley before and after the removal of the Indians; land deeds between whites date back to 1832, the year of Russell County's founding. The name of the town comes from the Indian name of a creek which originates nearby. In its early years it was a cultural, political and religious center. Three academies were established in the area: Good Hope, Spring Grove and Andrew’s Chapel. Russell County’s first member of the Alabama House of Representative, Nimrod Washington Long, was among the pioneers here.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

SIDE 2:  GOOD HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH, UCHEE
The oldest continually active church in Russell County is located on this lot. Good Hope Church was constituted July 29, 1837. The present building, as was that of the Methodist church, was constructed in 1857. They are the oldest continually used church structures in Russell County. The builder was L.S. Johnson. The original sixteen members had the names of Jelks, Covington, Miles, Davis, Turner, Wallace, Ivey, Thomas and a slave of E.C. Thomas. Their number increased rapidly and for years the Church was the wellspring for Baptist activity in the County.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.

37. UCHEE CHAPEL METHODIST CHURCH
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1998
Marker Text: 
This circa 1859 building is a very good and intact example of the temple front house of worship in the purest form of the Greek Revival style. It was constructed by L. S. Johnson at the same time as the nearby Good Hope Baptist Church. The Uchee Chapel membership dates from 1836. An early log church building was erected in 1838. The first pastor was David E. McIntyre, by his second conference year, could report 124 white and 53 black members. The church was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

Erected by Uchee Chapel Methodist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1998.

38. UNION NIGHT ATTACK DOWN SUMMERVILLE ROAD
 
Location: Phenix City, Alabama- Summerville Road at 26th Street.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2004
Marker Text: 
Confederate Captain Nat Clanton's battery sat astride Summerville Road on April 16, 1865 when Union forces launched a three-fisted night attack from northwest of this position. Elements of the Third and Fourth Iowa and the Tenth Missouri all passed beneath Clanton's guns in the darkness, which was lit only by the flashes of canons and small arms. The Federals quickly overran Confederates entrenchments and pressed on down Summerville Road to take Waddell's battery on Red Hill and the 14th Street Bridge across the Chattahoochee. An hour after the attack was launched, the battle of Girard-Columbus was over.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission And the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

39. VILLULA
 
Location: Located in front of Villula Cemetery, about 2 miles South of Seale, Alabama. On U.S. HWY 431 South.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 28, 2002
Marker Text: 
Originally known as Vilula, was a thriving and cultural community which was formed about 1848 as a stage coach stop. For many years the only post office in the central part of the county was located here. William A. Lester served as the first postmaster. The Villula Methodist Episcopal Church South was organized about 1850 and served the community until 1900, when it was relocated to Pittsview. The church and a two-room schoolhouse were once situated at the front entrance of Villula Cemetery. Of special note is "The Bird's Nest," constructed by Colonel Lyman Martin about 1858. This historic house was operated for many years by Mrs. Helen Jeorg and was known far and wide as Villula Tea Gardens.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Friends of Villula, 2002.

40. WILLIAM AGUSTUS MITCHELL
 
Location: Located on Alabama Highway 26 (Jackson Street), Seale, Alabama.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 17, 1979
SIDE 1:  WILLIAM AGUSTUS MITCHELL
On this lot and in the house thereon, was born William Augustus Mitchell, November 30, 1877. Mitchell entered the United States Military Academy on June 20, 1898, after finishing the schools at Seale and Alabama Polytechnic Institute. He graduated number one in his class in 1902. During World War I he was promoted to Brigadier General. After the War General Mitchell become a member of the faculty at West Point.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1979.

SIDE 2:  WILLIAM AUGUSTUS MITCHELL
General Mitchell received the following decorations: Distinguished Service Medal, Officer of the Legion of Honour, Croix de Guerre with Gold Star, Croix de Guerre with Palm. He was the son of James Bellingslea and Rebecca Stone Mitchell. His father entered as a Lieutenant in the 24th Alabama Regiment at age 18 in the War Between the States, and later served as State Senator from this district for seven years and was a member of the Alabama Supreme court. General Mitchell died March 6, 1941, and is buried at West Point, New York.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1979.

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