Historic Chattahoochee Commission.
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Chattahoochee County, Georgia»
1. CHATTAHOOCHEE COUNTY JAIL
 
Location: Mt. Olive & Boyd Street in Cusseta, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 14, 2002
SIDE 1: 
Constructed in 1902, this two-story fireproof facility was built to replace the previous two-story log jail. The Pauly Jail and Manufacturing Company of St. Louis, Missouri constructed the jail for $5,000. Romanesque influences such as the arched windows and door openings with an extended central bay enhance the exterior appearance of the building. The original prefabricated iron cells, with unique corner fireplaces, are located on the second floor. The jail served the county until 1975. It was placed on the National Register of HistoricPlaces on March 13, 1986.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Chattahoochee County Historic Preservation Society 2002.

SIDE 2:  CHATTAHOOCHEE COUNTY JAIL
This jail is situated on property that was purchased soon after the county was created on February 13, 1854. Mr. Asbury Bryan was paid $1,250 for the original two-story log jail that was completed by July 20, 1855, under the supervision of Sheriff Silas Brown. The dimensions of the log structure were eighteen by twenty-two feet with fifteen inches separating the double walls. The jail was used continuously until the new facility was completed in 1902. At that time LaFayette Harp served as sheriff.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Chattahoochee County Historic Preservation Society 2002.

2. DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER
 
Location: Located at Austin Loop and Vibbert Avenue, Fort Benning, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 20, 1990
SIDE 1: 
October 14, 1890-March 28, 1969

The 34th President of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, lived with his family at 206 Austin Loop, while stationed at Fort Benning as a major from 1926-1927. During that time, he served as executive office of the 24th Infantry and commanded the 2nd Battalion. He also coached the Fort Benning Doughboy football team to an all-Army championship. Dwight D. Eisenhower was born to Ida and David Eisenhower in Denison Texas on October 14, 1890. In 1891, he and his family moved to Abilene, Kansas. He was assigned to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where he met and married Mamie Geneva Doud in 1916.

Erected by the AUSA and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1990.

SIDE 2:  DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER
October 14, 1890-March 28, 1969

By 1918, Eisenhower was a lieutenant colonel battalion commander, but two years later as a captain, in a small peace-time Army, he nearly go out when not selected to attend the Infantry Officer's Course. He did attend Command and General Staff School, and was first in his class. During WWII, he commanded the Allied invasion of North Africa, the Italian Campaign, and all Allied expeditionary forces during the June 6, 1944 Normandy Invasion. After the war, he served as Chief of Staff of the Army and Supreme Commander of NATO. He was inaugurated as President in 1953, and served two terms. He died in Walter Reed Army Medical Center, March 28, 1969.

Erected by the AUSA and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1990.

3. FORT BENNING/FORT BENNING MILITARY RESERVATION
 
Location: In front of the VIP Headquarters, Richardson Circle, Fort Benning, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 31, 1982
SIDE 1:  FORT BENNING
Kasihta or Cusseta Town, an important Creek Nation market, played a part in American Revolutionary affairs. In 1780 British Colonel John Tate recruited a large force of local Indians for duty with the British in their defense of Augusta, Georgia. Colonel Tate became ill during the march to Augusta; was returned to Kasihta; died, and was buried on what is now the Fort Benning Military Reservation.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980.

SIDE 2:  FORT BENNING MILITARY RESERVATION
Established following World War One, this post occupies former Indian lands sold during the Georgia Land Lottery of 1827. John Woolfolk consolidated small land holdings in 1843. Benjamin Hatcher acquired the property in 1883. Arthur Bussey purchased the plantation in 1907, selling it to the Federal Government in 1919. Benning now occupies some 180,000 acres in Georgia and Alabama, most of which are in Chattahoochee County.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980.

4. FORT BENNING-STATION HOSPITAL/NATIONAL INFANTRY MUSEUM
 
Location: In front of the National Infantry Museum, Baltzell Avenue, Fort Benning, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 31, 1982
SIDE 1:  FORT BENNING-STATION HOSPITAL
In 1923, the U.S. Congress appropriated funds for the erection of a hospital at Fort Benning. The hospital complex, consisting of ten buildings, was opened in 1925. During World War Two as many as 36, 000 wounded per year received care at this facility. In 1951, during the Korean War, 25, 000 casualties were treated. Following the 1958 opening of a new hospital this complex served as and outpatient clinic until 1975 when the main building was designated the permanent home of the National Infantry Museum.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980

SIDE 2:  NATIONAL INFANTRY MUSEUM
The National Infantry Museum was established here at the U.S. Army's Infantry Center in October 1959. The purpose of the Museum is to honor the infantryman and his more that two centuries of proud service to the nation. The Museum also reflects the history of Fort Benning which was established October 1918. The collection is comprised of weapons, uniforms and accouterments used by the U.S. infantrymen is each of our military engagements. Foreign artifacts as well as military related objects of art are also on display. The Doughboy - Dog Faced Soldier – Infantryman. The Museum is dedicated to his honor.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980

5. THE INFANTRY BOARD
 
Location: In front of Building 76, Anderson Street, Fort Benning, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1991
SIDE 1: 
On 15 December 1919, War Department Orders established the Infantry Board as a development and testing laboratory with permanent station at Fort Benning, Georgia. The Board's mission was to consider, with continuity of effort the improvement of the Infantry. The history of the Infantry Board has been coincident with that of the Infantry Center and Fort Benning, "The Home of the Infantry".

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Fort Benning Infantry Board, 1991.

SIDE 2:  THE INFANTRY BOARD
From its very beginning, the Infantry Board was concerned with everything the Infantry Soldier used. Whether he shot it, rode in it, slept in it, ate it, wore it, or used it to accomplish his tactical missions, the Infantryman operating under combat conditions used products that had been tested by the Infantry Board. In consonance with its mission, the Infantry Board's motto was "ONLY THE BEST FOR THE FINEST!" From 1946 to 1991 the Infantry Board was headquartered in Building 76, on Anderson Street. The Infantry Board was discontinued effective 23 March 1991.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Fort Benning Infantry Board, 1991.

6. THE INFANTRY BOARD
 
Location: In front of Building 76, Anderson Street, Fort Benning, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  January 1, 1991
SIDE 1: 
On 15 December 1919, War Department Orders established the Infantry Board as a development and testing laboratory with permanent station at Fort Benning, Georgia. The Board's mission was to consider, with continuity of effort the improvement of the Infantry. The history of the Infantry Board has been coincident with that of the Infantry Center and Fort Benning, "The Home of the Infantry".

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Fort Benning Infantry Board, 1991.

SIDE 2:  THE INFANTRY BOARD
From its very beginning, the Infantry Board was concerned with everything the Infantry Soldier used. Whether he shot it, rode in it, slept in it, ate it, wore it, or used it to accomplish his tactical missions, the Infantryman operating under combat conditions used products that had been tested by the Infantry Board. In consonance with its mission, the Infantry Board's motto was "ONLY THE BEST FOR THE FINEST!" From 1946 to 1991 the Infantry Board was headquartered in Building 76, on Anderson Street. The Infantry Board was discontinued effective 23 March 1991.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Fort Benning Infantry Board, 1991.

Clay County, Georgia»
1. 1814 BOUNDARY
 
Location: Georgia Highway 39, North of Fort Gaines, Georgia, at East bank of the Chattahoochee River, Lake W.F. George
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 6, 1989
SIDE 1: 
The boundary line defined in the Treaty of Fort Jackson (August 1814) between the confederated Creek tribes and the United States extended eastward from the mouth of Cemochechobee Creek south of here to a point near Jesup, Georgia. Signed by General Andrew Jackson for the U.S. and Tustennuggee Thlocco (Big Warrior) and Tustennuggee Hopie (Little Prince) for the Creeks, the treaty ceded about 23 million acres of land and was intended to separate hostile Indians from British forces in Florida during the War of 1812.

SIDE 2:  FOUNDING OF FORT GAINES
A military garrison, later named Fort Gaines, was established on the Chattahoochee River to patrol the buffer against the British and hostile Indians created by the land ceded in the Treaty of Fort Jackson. Benjamin Hawkins, venerable Indian agent to the southern tribes, and troops commanded by Coweta Chief William McIntosh had the task of enforcing General Jackson's prohibition of any Indian entering the newly acquired territory. His orders were that "all persons carrying and bringing lies" to the British would be shot. He believed Oketeyeconne and Hitchiti towns near here were havens for spies.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Fort Gaines High School Class of '39.

2. MT GILEAD BAPTIST CHURCH FORT GAINES, GEORGIA
 
Location: Cotton Hill Road in Fort Gaines, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 13, 2003
Marker Text: 
This church was constituted on July 21, 1822, under the leadership of the Reverend Jim Davis, when Fort Gaines was part of Early County. Land for the church was donated and deeded by J. Hugh Edge. The first building, which also served as a schoolhouse, was constructed of hand-hewn logs. In 1839, Mt. Gilead joined the Bethel Baptist Association in Americus, Georgia. Included on the five acre church property is a cemetery with the earliest grave dating from 1865. A baptismal pool, inscribed with the date of 1828, is located across the road from the present church building and is still being used.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, 2002.

3. NEW LOWELL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Location: New Lowell United Methodist Church. County Road 129 2.6 miles West of Georgia Highway 39. 12.4 miles north of Fort Gaines Courthouse Dedication
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 25, 1986
SIDE 1: 
Methodist Episcopal Church worship services were conducted in this area during the early 1840's in a brush arbor. The original church, known as Lowell, was destroyed by fire during the Civil War. From 1865 to 1890 the Methodists and Baptists worshiped together at Union Church at Midway and later at Salem Church. The present church was built in 1900 from virgin pine and the interior still contains the original pews, pulpit and altar rail. On January 9, 1901 the church was deeded as a place of worship by W. T. Credille. The trustees were E. A. Standley, E. D. Griffin and J. A. Wash. The church became a charge of the Fort Gaines Circuit July 22, 1903.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the New Lowell United Methodist Church, 1986.

SIDE 2:  NEW LOWELL SCHOOL
This area was settled about 1820 along the falls of Pataula Creek in a community known as Lowell. The falls provided water power for several commercial enterprises including a saw mill, cotton gin and grist mill. The community was later known as Garfield. Grades one through ten attended the school in the school house which was built circa 1890. Classes were for 10-25 children who performed housekeeping and janitorial duties as well as school work. The last class was held in 1921. The schoolhouse was also used as a center for social functions and as a place of worship. About 1900 the community became known as Gilbert and later as Credille's Mill.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the New Lowell United Methodist Church, 1986.

**This marker was funded by the HCC’s Matching Grant Program.

4. OAKLAND HIGH SCHOOL
 
Location: U.S. Highway 27, ½ mile South of Sutton’s Crossroads in Clay County, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 6, 2004
Marker Text: 
Founded in the 1880's Oakland High School's name was derived from oak trees which grewin abundance at this location when the school building was constructed. The school originally had 10 grades. Mrs. Arlene Newton Richardson taught here from 1908 to 1912 and established the first home economics course taught in southwest Georgia. Students participated in the course from as far away as Columbus and Macon, Georgia. Six students comprised the last graduating class in 1929. The next year Oakland became a junior high school. It closed its doors in 1937 when classes were consolidated with Fort Gaines High School. The old school building was demolished in 1957.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commissionand Students, Family and Friends of Oakland High School, 2004.

5. OKETEYECONNE
 
Location: Georgia Highway 39, North of Fort Gaines, Georgia. East bank of the Chattahoochee River, Lake W.F. George
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  August 6, 1989
SIDE 1: 
Oketeyeconne, or Okitiyakani, was a Hitchiti-speaking Lower Creek town located near here on the east bank of the Chattahoochee River south of Sandy Creek during the late frontier period. Described in 1799 by Benjamin Hawkins, "… the little village, Oketeyeconne, is situated on good land….From this village they have settlements down as low as the forks of the river….They raise plenty of corn and rice and have cattle, horses and hogs."

As the southernmost of the main towns on the Chattahoochee, the people shared affiliations with—to the north—the predominantly Muskogee-speaking Creek Confederation and a Hitchiti ‘mother town' and – to the south—Hitchiti-speaking towns of the Sawokli, Tamathli, Apalachicola, Yamasee, Mikasuki and other Seminoles.

Though peaceful and considered friendly by the Americans, many of the Lower Creeks and Seminoles had strong ties to the British from Revolutionary War service and trade. Distressed by continual encroachments of white settlers, the American war against the Red Sticks faction of the Upper Creeks, and a severe shortage of food, Lower Creeks and Seminoles led by William and Thomas Perryman appealed to the British and Spanish for arms and supplies in September 1813.

SIDE 2:  CHATTAHOOCHEE THEATER
William and Thomas Perryman became leaders of the war faction of the Lower Creeks and Seminoles. Their settlement, known as Perryman, on the Chattahoochee above the Flint became headquarters for the ‘Hostiles'. Their relative, James Perryman, was chief of Oketeyeconne.

The Creek Indians’ requests for aid suggested to the British high command a strategy of using privilegeless groups such as Indians, slaves, and pirates in the Gulf region to divert American forces from Canada. The Creeks indicated that contact could be maintained with the Four Nations -- Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees -- from Apalachicola Bay. Thus the Chattahoochee became central to British invasion plans. Upon arrival with munitions at Apalachicola in May 1814, the British found many starving Red Stick refugees who had come there following their defeat by Jackson at Horseshoe Bend in March.

People from Oketeyeconne were prominent among those being armed. Hawkins reported: "They gave four kegs of cartridges of 100 lbs each to Oketeyeconne and Tuttallossee and some arms, short rifles and others." Receiving such reports, Jackson demanded a huge land cession, mostly from his Lower Creek allies, with the line strategically located just south of Oketeyeconne to suppress the insurgency.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Fort Gaines High School Class of 1938. Erected in 1989.

6. OLD PIONEER CEMETERY
 
Location: Carroll Street, Fort Gaines, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 3, 1982
Marker Text: 
This was the first established cemetery of Fort Gaines. The earliest death date on a stone marker is 1830. The tombs of Georgia Militia General John Dill and his family are found in an enclosed lot. Reverend John E. Brown, second president of the University of Georgia, and his wife are interred in this graveyard. Many early settlers, both black and white, are buried here in unmarked graves.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980.

7. THE 1836 FORT
 
Location: Off Georgia Highway 39, on the bluff overlooking the Chattahoochee River in Fort Gaines, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 4, 1996
Marker Text: 
In May of 1836 the 88th Regiment of the Georgia Militia built a small fort in anticipation of an attack by the Creek Indians. The Steamer GEORGIAN had arrived crowded with women and children fleeing from the Indian uprising at Roanoke upriver. The Steamer ANNA CALHOUN was pressed for 5,000 pounds of bacon and 8 barrels of flour in order to feed the refugees and militia. The uprising was quelled before the fighting reached Fort Gaines. This was one of the last major insurgences of the Creeks before their removal to the West.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Local Color Publishers and "Tale of the Naked Hitchhiker" 1996.

8. THE OLD LATTICE BRIDGE
 
Location: Near the old toll house on the east bank of the Chattahoochee River, Bluff Street, Fort Gaines, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 3, 1997
SIDE 1: 
The second covered bridge across the Chattahoochee River connecting Clay County, Georgia and Henry County, Alabama, was constructed between 1867-69. Bonner and Walden, a New York construction company, were the original contractors but the bridge was completed by Horace King. After the three, span bridge collapsed during the flood of March 1875, the original stockholders relinquished control of the structure to the City of Fort Gaines on the condition that the city should rebuild at the public expense. A $7,500 bond issue was floated and the bridge was rebuilt by Captain B. B. McKenzie of Eufaula, Alabama.

Dedication date: December 3, 1987.

SIDE 2: 
Following the reopening of the covered bridge in 1875, the City of Fort Gaines considered levying ad valorem taxes to help retire the bridge repair bond issue. Angry property owners proposed that the city sell the bridge to any person who would guarantee to retire the bonds. After considerable debate, the bridge was sold to David C. Adams who realized a handsome profit on his investment. The flood of March 1888 partially destroyed the bridge again and it was resold to the city of $5,000. The bridge was then rebuilt by William King, son of Horace King. The covered bridge was in use until 1925 when the Henry-Clay cantilever bridge was opened.

9. TONEY-STANDLEY HOUSE
 
Location: County Road 135, West of Georgia Highway 39 - 9 miles north of Fort Gaines, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 28, 1980
SIDE 1: 
Local tradition maintains that the Toney-Standley House was built about 1803 by Mr. William Toney. It is reputed that on two occasions Toney had as his overnight guest Aaron Burr, third Vice-President of the United States. Legend has it that Burr stopped here while fleeing to Florida in 1804 and in 1807 after he was arrested for treason by General Edmund Pendleton Gaines.

SIDE 2:  TONEY-STANDLEY HOUSE
In 1959, the Toney-Standley House was moved from its original site, near Sandy Creek, to its present location. This Plantation Plain style structure is similar to the other early homes built in the Chattahoochee River Valley of Alabama and Georgia. On September 7, 1974, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980.

Decatur County, Georgia»
1. AMSTERDAM, GEORGIA
 
Location: Decatur County, Georgia. Near Amsterdam on US 27/Georgia 1, Southeast of Bainbridge
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 1987
SIDE 1: 
In 1891, A. Cohn & Company purchased 14,000 acres for tobacco cultivation and named it Amsterdam. At that time, the property was the largest tobacco plantation in the world, under one ownership. In 1907, seven of the larger growers and packers in the area merged to form the American Sumatra Tobacco Company, with a division in Amsterdam. This was a company town with offices, railroad, commissaries, post office, packing houses and employee houses. At its peak, the town boasted a population of 450. The Imperial Tobacco Company bought the American Sumatra Tobacco Company in 1955 and operated it until 1965 when they discontinued growing tobacco. In 1967 the land was sold to the Coastal Lumber Company.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Decatur County Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 1986.

SIDE 2:  SHADE GROWN TOBACCO
Cigar wrapper tobacco was grown only in a small area of Georgia, Florida and the Connecticut River Valley from the 1840s to 1975. During the 1890s, wooden arbors began to be used to make the leaves lighter and thinner. Later, cheese cloth tents were used to filter sunlight and keep insects out. After World War II, production was mechanized, but the cultivation of tobacco still remained on of the most labor intensive crops grow. With the extension of wage and hour to farm labor, costs rose to $7,000 per acre making the growing of tobacco economically prohibitive.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Decatur County Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 1986.

2. ATTAPULGUS WHITE SCHOOL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2005
SIDE 1: 
A male academy was established in Attapulgus in 1836 and a female academy in 1852. A four-room frame building was built on the site after establishment of public education in Georgia in 1872. In 1921 Mariola School joined Attapulgus and a frame stucco building of eight rooms was built. It burned in 1922. In 1925 Amsterdam School merged with Attapulgus and an eight room brick building was built. In 1933 the locals provided materials and the WPA provided labor to build THE SHELL, a gymnasium. Later an AG building, classrooms and a lunch room were added.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission Alumni of Attapulgus School and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2005.

SIDE 2:  ATTAPULGUS WHITE SCHOOL
With county consolidation, the High School was moved to Bainbridge in 1966 and the elementary grades in 1971. In 1972 a tornado badly damaged the main building and destroyed the gymnasium and AG building. The County Board declared the property surplus and sold it to Attapulgus Baptist Church in 1973. With dedicated teachers, an excellent curriculumwas taught. When the Attapulgus School closed, all teachers held masters degrees or better. Many of the schools graduates went on to higher education, performing as well or better than those from larger schools.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission Alumni of Attapulgus School and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2005.

3. BAINBRIDGE ARMY AIR FIELD
 
Location: U. S. Highway 27 North, 8 miles from Bainbridge, Georgia, at the Bainbridge Industrial Park.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1980
Marker Text: 
In August, 1942, on this 2,053 acre tract, the U. S. Army constructed a basic flight training field. It remained open until 1945. At its peak 9,600 men, trainees and WACS were stationed here; there were 700 civilian employees. Several hundred WW II German P. O. W.s were imprisoned here in 1951. Southern Airways School, a private company, contracted with the U. S. A. F. to train its pilots. The base closed in 1961 and became industrial park.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 1980.

4. BATTLE OF 1702
 
Location: GA 97, just south of GA 311 intersection at Bainbridge
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 1987
Marker Text: 
In this vicinity was fought the Flint Battle of 1702 between the English under Captain Antonio with Creek allies from Achito (near Columbus) and the Spaniards under Captain Francisco Romo Uriz with 800 Indians from Bacuqua (north of Tallahassee). In a battle at daybreak the English defeated the Spaniards, killing or capturing 600. This battle was a prelude to Queen Annes War and first blow for control for the Mississippi valley by the English. It ended the advance of the Spaniards up the Chattahoochee and Flint valleys and Frances ambition in Alabama.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The City of Bainbridge, 1985.

5. BRINSON
 
Location: Georgia Highway 310, just north of US 84 in Brinson, Georgia. (In Cemetery) West of Bainbridge.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 1987
SIDE 1: 
First settled in the 1850s present day Brinson was originally known as Spring Creek. The name was changed in 1889 when the town was laid out and established by Simeon Brinson. In that same year the Alabama Midland Railroad completed a line through the town. Brinson soon became a shipping point for agricultural products, lumber and naval stores which were the major industries in the area. By an act of the Georgia General Assembly on August 22, 1907, the village was incorporated at the Town of Brinson. Brinson began to decline because of the closing of sawmill operations between 1910-1920.

SIDE 2:  SIMEON BRINSON 1847-1918
The town of Brinson was named in honor of Simeon Brinson, a prominent farmer and businessman. Brinson, a native of Dougherty County, saw action during the War Between the Sates as a private in Company E, Fifth Georgia Cavalry. After the war he moved to Decatur County. Brinson served as the first postmaster of the Spring Creek Post Office which was established in 1874. He was still postmaster when the name of the post office was changed to Brinson on August 24, 1889. Brinson served as mayor of the town in 1907 and 1913-1914 and two terms (1909-1912) in the Georgia General Assembly. He is interred in the Brinson Cemetery.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Commission, 1986.

6. CAMP RECOVERY
 
Location: Booster Club Road,West of Georgia Highway 310, 3 miles north of Georgia Highway 97
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1995
Marker Text: 
The medical camp was established on September 15, 1820 by the Southeastern Army of the United States headquartered at Fort Scott. It was used as a recuperation area for soldiers who had contracted malaria and dysentery in the swampy environs of the fort. Soldiers considered the fort to be the deadliest military assignment in the country because of numerous illnesses and deaths there. The camp was located on a high ridge three miles southeast of Fort Scott. A 34-pound cannon marks the site of the camp and the nearby cemetery for the soldiers who perished here.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Decatur Historical Society, 1995.

7. CHARLES JAMES MUNNERLYN
 
Location: South of Bainbridge, Georgia on Georgia Highway 97.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 1987
SIDE 1: 
As a delegate to the Georgia Convention at Milledgeville, he voted for secession. After the start of the Civil War, he volunteered as a private. When his health failed he returned home and was elected to the Confederate Congress where he served from 1862-1864. His re-election bid was defeated because he voted for the Conscript Law. He then re-entered the Confederate army as a private but was soon promoted to major through the influence of Jefferson Davis. When surrender came he was a lieutenant colonel.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Board of Commissioners, 1985.

SIDE 2:  REFUGE
Charles James Munnerlyn lived in an elegant residence called Refuge. This beautiful house boasted an extensive library and an organ. The pipe organ was installed for the pleasure of Munnerlyns wife, Harriet Eugenia Shackelford Munnerlyn. The family cemetery is situated near this marker. It is located about 800 feet north of the site of Refuge. The house burned in 1883. The Munnerlyn plantation contained over 3,000 acres and had a landing on the Flint River. It was worked by over 200 slaves.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Board of Commissioners, 1985.

8. CLIMAX, GEORGIA
 
Location: Located at Climax, Georgia on Georgia Highway 262, just North of US Highway 84
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 1987
Marker Text: 
Climax is the highest point on the railroad between Savannah, Georgia, and the Chattahoochee River. The town was laid out and named in 1883 after a branch rail line was built to Chattahoochee, Florida. Later, a second branch line was built to Amsterdam, Georgia. The town served as a rail junction and an agricultural community for many years, but was not incorporated until August 11, 1905. It flourished, with businesses, churches, a school, hotels, and services needed to sustain the community. With the coming of paved highways and the cutback of rail services, the towns economic strength declined.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, The City of Climax and the Decatur County Commission, 1986

9. CYRENE INSTITUTE
 
Location: Located 1.6 miles south of Cyrene, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 11, 1987
SIDE 1: 
This school was founded in 1909 by C. S. Hodges and W. G. Powell, at the Village of Cyrene, to provide preparatory education for boys. Later that year the curricula was expanded to provide co-educational teaching and the facilities were enlarged to accommodate boarding students. At that time the school was deeded to the Bowen Baptist Association. Cyrene Institute offered primary and secondary education with some college preparatory courses. The school facilities included a girls and boys dormitory, dining hall and general administration building. Accommodations were available for approximately 100 students. After only a few years in operation the school closed about 1916.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1986.

SIDE 2:  CYRENE
Approximately 1.6 miles north of this location is the village of Cyrene. Founded about 1890 by C. S. Hodges and W. G. Powell, Cyrene was typical of the many mill towns established along the railroad to utilize the vast forests of Southern Pine. Naval stores and lumber were the primary products taken from these forests. At one time, the village had a post office, sawmill, turpentine still, cotton gin, commissaries and about 500 inhabitants. After the loss of the Hodges Sawmill to fire in 1927 and the lean Depression years that followed, the naval stores industry began to decline. Today only a few people live in the town of Cyrene.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1986.

10. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Location: At the Church, 300 West Shotwell Street, Bainbridge, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1980
Marker Text: 
Founded in 1823, title to this property was conveyed to the church in 1830 by the Inferior Court, Bainbridge. An initial building was erected about 1840 and was also used during the 1850s for services by Baptists and Presbyterians. In 1854 an enlarged wooden structure was completed and served the congregation until 1899, when a brick facility was fabricated. Fire destroyed the church in 1906, but the building was replaced by the present structure and hosted the 1911 South Georgia Annual Conference.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 1980.

11. HUTTO SCHOOL
 
Location: In front of the Hutto Middle School on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Bainbridge, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 18, 2004
SIDE 1:  HUTTO SCHOOL
The first school for former slaves in this county was established in 1869 and was known as the Whittier School and Tabernacle for Colored Children. It was on Shotwell Street and had grades 1-7. The name soon changed to Whittier Normal School since graduates were permitted to take state teacher's exams. In 1895 George Hutto became Principal. The following year, after the Plessy v Ferguson "separate but equal' court decision the Shotwell Street building was torn down and Mr. Hutto was authorized to erect a new school at this site. At that time the name was changed to Bainbridge Colored Grade School. Mr. Hutto served as principal until his death in 1922.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2004.

SIDE 2:  HUTTO SCHOOL
The school was re-named in honor of Mr. Hutto and his widow Addie became principal. By her efforts a matching grant from the Rosenwald Fund was obtained to build a high school on the site. Grade 11 was added in 1928. Accreditation came in 1929 with the name Hutto High School. After 52 years of service Addie Hutto retired in 1942 and William Mann succeeded her. Grade 12 was added in 1953. Hutto High graduated its last class in 1970. Later that year Hutto High combined with Bainbridge High and this facility became Hutto Junior High. In 1990 it became Hutto Middle School.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2004.

12. IRA SANBORN
 
Location: Faceville, Georgia. Along Georgia Highway 97-Grounds of the Masonic Lodge.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 12, 2001
Marker Text: 
Decatur Countys first industrialist was Ira Sanborn, a native of Concord, New Hampshire. Born in 1799, Sanborn came to Apalachicola, Florida about 1830 and later resettled in Quincy, Florida where he married Susan Woodson. In 1833 they moved to Decatur County and settled on Attapulgus Creek. Using waterpower he operated a gristmill, sawmill, tanning, cigar and shoe factories. In 1856 he opened Estahatchee Mills which made a cotton and wool fabric called kersey. Sanborn died on a business trip to Boston in 1865 and was buried in Concord. The Estahatchee Mills buildings were razed in 1870. Today only the mill races and the outline of the pond levee remain.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2001.

13. STEAMBOATS
 
Location: Bainbridge, Georgia. Off Water Street in Cheney Griffin Park about 40 yards from the water.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  July 18, 2002
SIDE 1: 
In 1827 the Fanny was the first of more than 220 steamboats to visit Bainbridge and ply the waters of the Apalachicola Chattahoochee-Flint river system. These boats docked at the city's landings below the high bluff on the Flint River. Boatyards on both sides of the river built craft for individuals and the U. S. Government. Several steamboat lines operated here including the Oak City Navigation Co. (later known as the Bainbridge Navigation Co.),which was organized in 1901 and the Callahan Line, which was formed in 1906. The last working steamboat on the Flint River was the Elberta, which went out of service in the late 1930's.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2002

SIDE 2:  STEAMBOATS
Between Columbus, Georgia and Apalachicola, Florida many steamboat landings dotted the riverbanks. Smaller boats navigated Spring Creek, the Chipola River and the Flint River to Newton and Albany. In addition to passengers, the boats hauled cotton, rosin, turpentine, fertilizer, lumber, oysters, catfish, honey, bricks and shingles. The river system was one of the most dangerous in the United States and many boats met misfortune by hitting rocks, snags and ferry cables. Other boats ran aground on sandbars or sank due to boiler explosions. It is said that there are more sunken boats per mile on this river system than any other system in the country.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Decatur County Historical Society, 2002

14. VILLAGE OF FOWLTOWN
 
Location: Decatur County, Georgia. Green Shade Road, Highway 309 in Fowlstown, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1994
Marker Text: 
In this vicinity stood the Seminole village of Fowltown, scene of battle, November 21, 1817, which marked the beginning of the First Seminole Indian War. The engagement resulted when Major Twiggs with 250 soldiers from Fort Scott attempted to arrest its warriors for depredations against the white frontier. A second conflict occurred at the village and nearby swamp November 23, 1817, U.S. Soldiers being led by Lt. Col. Arbuckle. On January 4, 1818, the village was found deserted and destroyed.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Decatur County Historical Society and Friends, 1994

Early County, Georgia»
1. CENTERVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Location: 8 miles South of Blakely on Three Notch Road at Damascus-Hilton Road
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1998
SIDE 1: 
The Centerville Methodist Church was organized in 1891, and the people of the community erected the first church building eight miles south of Blakely on the Three Notch Road. It was a pine log structure with posts in the middle section for support and two single doors for entering the church. The original floor joists and ceiling trusses, which were made of whole pine logs, are still in place. A wood stove was placed in the middle of the room to warm the congregation. The church was dedicated on August 7, 1898, with Reverend C. C. Lowe serving as its first pastor. In 1976, the social hall was added and synthetic siding installed.

Erected by the Centerville United Methodist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1998.

SIDE 2:  CENTERVILLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Ben Johnson and his wife, Miss Ellie attended the DuBose Methodist Church located six miles away until they were caught in a rainstorm that frightened their horse. In an attempt to get a church nearer home, Ben Johnson and Dick Mock rode for several days before finding someone to donate land for the church. Most of the land in the area was mortgaged because of the Civil War but Elian Harper deeded four acres to church trustees, Ben Johnson, Sam Roe Johnson and John King to be used for a church and a cemetery. Miss Ellie named it Centerville because it was in the middle of the community.

Erected by the Centerville United Methodist Church and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1998.

2. COHEELEE CREEK BRIDGE
 
Location: Coheelee Park, at the covered bridge - Old River Road off Georgia Highway 62
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 31, 1980
SIDE 1: 
According to the May 2, 1883 minutes of the Early County Board of Commissioners, a commission was appointed to inquire into the practicability of construction a bridge across Coheelee Creek at McDonald Ford. However, the construction contract was not let until July 7, 1891. Cost of labor was $490.41 with J. W. Baughman serving as supervisor and W. C. Sheffield, Chairman of the 1891 Commissioners.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Early County Historical Society, 1980.

Location: Coheelee Park, at the covered bridge, 9 miles southwest of Blakely, Georgia, on Old River Road near Hilton, Georgia, off Georgia Highway 62

SIDE 2:  FANNIE ASKEW WILLIAMS PARK
The Fannie Askew Williams Park, a picnic area adjacent to Coheelee Creek Covered Bridge on Old River Road, is maintained by the Early County Board of Commissioners. The land was made available to the county in 1959 by the late John H. Williams, of Blakely, and bears the name of his first wife. The Peter Early Chapter DAR serves as custodian of the Park.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Early County Historical Society, 1980.

3. COHEELEE CREEK COVERED BRIDGE (Directional)
 
Location: Located on Georgia 92, 2 miles south of the bridge
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 22, 1985
Marker Text: 
Constructed in 1891 by the Early County Commissioner, this relic of by-gone days is the southernmost covered bridge in the United States. The bridge consists of two spans, measuring 96 feet in length. Of the queen-post truss modified design, it stretches across Coheelee Creek with its picturesque waterfalls. The Fannie Askew Williams Park, a county maintained picnic area, is adjacent to the bridge. Coheelee Creek covered bridge is located two miles north of Georgia 62 on Old River Road. On May 13, 1976, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Early County Historical Society, 1985.

4. HILTON SCHOOL
 
Location: Georgia 62 West, at Hilton, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  1994
Marker Text: 
Formal education began in 1897 on land from J. C. Hudspeth and Mrs. Elizabeth Freeman. A petition in 1924 halted a school at Waters Ford. In 1925 a spacious masonry school opened one mile west of this marker for students from Freeman, Hilton, Rock Hill and Sowhatchee. The name was changed to Hilton Consolidated School. In 1932 students came in from Byrons Academy, Centerville and Lucile. Vocational classrooms, canning plant, lunchroom and gymnasium enhanced the complex before the high school closed in 1955. An elementary school continued until 1960. Many lives and destinies were shaped here.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Friends of Hilton School, 1994.

5. HILTON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
 
Location: Georgia 62, Hilton, Georgia-On road to Coheelee Park
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  April 24, 1994
Marker Text: 
The Hilton Methodist Episcopal Church, South was organized in 1850. The first church was erected one mile southwest of Hilton on the Lower River Road. This structure was sold after the Civil War and services were then conducted in an arbor. E. Hilton deeded land to the church trustees for the present site on November 1, 1889. The pegged-frame building for the Hilton United Methodist Church was built in 1890 and the social hall was added in 1973.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Hilton United Methodist Church, 1994.

6. OLD FACTORY CREEK
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 1, 2002
Marker Text: 
In 1855, Anthony Hutchins and a group of local citizens built a two-story cotton mill of handmade bricks, fired in Early County, on the north side of Harrod's Creek. The mill, known as the Early County Manufacturing Company, was constructed to spin the cotton produced in the area. It was powered from the falls on Harrod's Creek. Thread from the factory was sold to the W.C Bradley Company in Columbus, GA. The mill operated for two decades before closing in 1876. Trespassers burned the abandoned structure on March 17, 1927. Over time the name of the creek changed from "Harrod's" to "Old Factory."

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Early County Historical Society, 2002

* Orginal marker was placed on 10-31-1980. The marker was damaged beyond repair. A new marker was erected in 2002, with a slightly different text. Marker has been stolen from sight.

Harris County, Georgia»
1. B. F. WHITE (1800-1879)
 
Location: Town Square in Hamilton, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  September 6, 1984
Marker Text: 
Song writer, teacher, editor, lived in Hamilton, 1843-c. 1868, was mayor, 1865. Near this spot in 1844 he published Sacred Harp, a fa-sol-la acappella singing school book now in its 14th edition. While taught in a local academy, conducted singing schools in many places and organized singing conventions, some of which still exist. He died in Atlanta and is buried in Oakland Cemetery.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Friends and Family of B. F. White, 1984.

Revised 6-25-1984

2. CALLAWAY GARDENS
 
Location: U. S. Highway 27, Callaway Gardens Information Center
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 20, 1982
SIDE 1: 
Callaway Gardens was founded in 1952 by Cason Callaway, Sr. and his wife Virginia Callaway, for the purpose of preserving the native flora of the southern United Sates in a natural setting for the public to enjoy. At one time, this area was marginal farm land, depleted of its natural beauty and vegetation by overuse. The Callaways rebuilt this land into 2,500 acres of trees, shrubs and flowering plants.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation, 1980.

SIDE 2:  CALLAWAY GARDENS
Callaway Gardens is owned and operated by a non-profit organization, the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation, which is dedicated to horticulture, charity, religion, education and science. The Gardens are cared for and strengthened each year for the benefit and gratification of todays generations and generations to come. This property symbolized the past, the present, and the future of this regions landscape.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation, 1980.

3. CAMP McKENZIE
 
Location: Callaway Woods Subdivision, Whitesville Road, North of Columbus
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 5, 2001
SIDE 1: 
On this site was Camp McKenzie, a 350 acre tract used for approximately 75 years as the official campsite for the local councils of the Boy Scouts of America. Under the leadership of W. W. McKenzie and Fred H. Schomburg, together with J. Homer Dimon, Jas. B. Key, Dan Joseph, J. Dupont Kirven, H. B. Crowell and J. A. Thomas, Camp McKenzie was incorporated in March 1921, Through the efforts of Frank G. Lumpkin Sr., Sidney Colquitt and many others, funds were raised to purchase the acreage and construct facilities.

Erected by the Ole Scouts of Camp McKenzie and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

SIDE 2:  CAMP McKENZIE
In 1965 a group led by Cason J. Callaway, Jr., donated an additional and adjacent 320-acre tract to the Chattahoochee Council. The new area was named Camp Callaway. In 1955, the Council signed an agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for 900 acres of land on the West Point Lake and camping facilities have been moved to that location. This marker is erected to honor those men who had the foresight and the will to make Camp McKenzie and Camp Callaway possible for the thousands of boys who learned to love them both and who will forever hold fond memories of their experiences here. Erected by the Ole Scouts of Camp McKenzie and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1999.

4. CHIPLEY-PINE MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA
 
Location: Commerce Avenue, Pine Mountain, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 20, 1982
Marker Text: 
Chipley was incorporated on December 9, 1882, following the extension of the Columbus and Rome Railroad one mile north of the Village of Hood. Old Hood was the predecessor of Chipley. Chipley was named after Colonel W. D. Chipley, a partner in the promotion of the railroad. The name was changed to Pine Mountain of February 19, 1958, after publicity generated by nearby Callaway Gardens established the location of this vacation resort at Pine Mountain.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 1980.

5. HAMILTON FEMALE COLLEGE
 
Location: Located on College Street in Hamilton, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 19, 2002
Marker Text: 
The Hamilton Female College was chartered in 1853 in southern Harris County. It was located on what was known as College Hill. Asbury Johnston and Stephen A. Borders donated the property for the college. The Hamilton Female College was the first chartered school in Harris County. Before 1853, Georgias General Assembly had refused to permit the beginning of female academies. Education was mainly for males. Seventeen years later, in 1870, the school burned.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Mrs. ONeals Odyssey Class, Mulberry Creek Elementary School 2002.

6. MOUNTAIN HILL DISTRICT CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL
 
Location: 47 Mountain Hill Road at Georgia Highway 219, Near Hamilton, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  November 8, 2002
SIDE 1: 
This handsome Colonial Revival structure, completed in 1930, served the educational needs of children in the western half of Harris County from 1930 through 1989. The building, which consolidated several one-and-two-room schools, was designed by the Atlanta architectural firm Lockwood and Poundstone. Incorporating state-of-the-art features including central hear, indoor plumbing and electricity, the school building provided students with amenities unknown in most of their home. Funding for construction of the school came primarily from the local community through a bond issue in the amount of $60,000.

Erected by the Mountain Hill Schoolhouse Foundation, Inc. and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2000.

SIDE 2:  MOUNTAIN HILL DISTRICT CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL
The school had 9 classrooms and a 436-seat auditorium to serve both elementary and high school students. In this auditorium Chet Atkins, member of Country Music Hall of Fame and a student at Mountain Hill School during the 1930s perfected his distinctive guitar style. The Mountain Hill Schoolhouse Foundation, Inc., formed to save the school building from demolition, has been instrumental in restoring the building as a community center. The building is owned by Harris County.

Erected by the Mountain Hill Schoolhouse Foundation, Inc. and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, 2000.

7. SUNNYSIDE SCHOOL, MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH AND MIDWAY CEMETERY HISTORIC DISTRICT
 
Location: Hopewell Church Road at Sunnyside Church Road, West of Pine Mountain, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2000
Marker Text: 
The community buildings and spaces in the Sunnyside/Midway Historic District reflect rural Harris County in the 1920s. Sunnyside School was built by local residents in 1921 to consolidate several one-room schools. It was used as an elementary and high school until the 1940s. It served as clubhouse for the Home Demonstration Club and now houses the Sunnyside Community Club. Midway Baptist Church was founded in 1921 and met in the school until the church was completed in 1925. These buildings have been in continuous use since their construction.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Midway Baptist Church and Sunnyside Community Club, 2000.

8. VALLEY OF HOPE
 
Location: 13159 Georgia Highway 116, Pine Mountain Valley, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 19, 2002
Marker Text: 
Pine Mountain Valley, Georgia was begun in November 1934 under the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal plan. It was conceived as a pilot community relief project to provide an escape from the effects of the Great Depression. Situated on this land was the administration building for the coordination of the Pine Mountain Valley Development Project. Victims of the Great Depression were resettled here in an effort to develop a sense of security, while providing facilities to produce and opportunities to supplement their income through agricultural and industrial activities.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Mrs. ONeals Odyssey Class Mulberry Creek Elementary School, 2002

9. WHITESVILLE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH
 
Location: Pine Lake Road in Whitesville, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  October 13, 2002
SIDE 1: 
The Methodist church in Whitesville had its origins about 1828 in meetings held at the home of Reuben Mobley. The First Methodist Church was founded in the early 1830s and by 1837 the decision was made to erect a church for the growing congregation on land donated by a trustee. The first church was used until 1854, when the current building was completed. This was the early church of Rev. William Jackson Callahan, a 1891 Emory graduate who was a missionary in Japan. Rev. Charles L. Allen, later pastor of Grace Methodist Church in Atlanta and well-known author, preached his first sermon here. The Whitesville Methodist Church has been actively in use as a Methodist church since its dedication.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Whitesville United Methodist Church, 2002

SIDE 2:  WHITESVILLE METHODIST CHURCH CEMETERY
The adjacent cemetery predates the church building. It has several types of burial markings from the earliest stacked stone and brick graves to metal mail-ordered grave markers. There are numerous family plots defined by retaining walls, copings and iron fencing. Many graves are unmarked as uninscribed field stone markers were inadvertently removed. The earliest burial date on a marker is 1844 for Reuben Mobley, one of the church founders.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Whitesville United Methodist Church 2002.

Muscogee County, Georgia»
1. COLORED DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY HOSPITAL
 
Location: Corner of 17th Street & 8th Avenue (across from the backside of Linwood Cemetery) Columbus, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 9, 2004
SIDE 1: 
The first City Hospital, c. 1841, was located on the South Commons. Called the Pest House, its clients were charity patients. The second City Hospital, c. 1894, was built across from Linwood Cemetery. Architectural details of the Victorian era hospital included a turret, porte-cochere and covered walkways from white and colored wards leading to a brick operating room, to the left of the building. Columbus third hospital was built in 1915, with the Colored Department building located to the rear. The Colored Department was a three-story brick structure completely fitted with the latest and most modern equipment, providing thirty beds.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Alfonso Biggs and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2003.

SIDE 2:  DOCTORS AND NURSES
The service of midwives in early years was vital to the health of Columbus colored patients. The Columbus Colored Medical Association was responsible for the building and maintenance of the Colored Department building in 1915. Dr. W.T. Ayers, Dr. E.J. Turner, Dr. D.W. Gallimore, Dr. M.L. Taylor and Dr. Thomas H. Brewer comprised the board. The Public Health Nurse Association began in 1917. The first colored nurse hired was Sarah V. Allen. Three other colored nurses were soon hired to fulfill the growing need. They were Dagmar Ferell, Mabel Priester and Erlynne Oglen. The four nurses assisted in bedside care and home instruction.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Alfonso Biggs and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2003.

2. HOLSEY CHAPEL CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
 
Location: 718 8th Street, Columbus, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 19, 2004
SIDE 1: 
In 1884, a group of black citizens banded together to organize a church. They appealed to the Commissioners of Columbus, Georgia, and obtained a lot on Eighth Street. The first church was completed in 1886 and called Everett Chapel after Newton Everett, one of the original founders and trustees. In 1894, the church was renamed Holsey Chapel, after Bishop Lucius H. Holsey, who played a vital role in the organization of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1915, Holsey Chapel was destroyed by a storm. A new building was completed in 1919, along with a parsonage. The current brick structure was built in 1946.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Holsey Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, 2004.

SIDE 2:  Holsey Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church
In 1888, Reverend P. W. Powell became pastor of Everett Chapel. When Everett Chapel was renamed Holsey Chapel in 1894, Revered C. T. Shatten served the congregation. Revered Loyd McAfee was pastor from 1904 until 1919. Other pastors have included the Reverends Samuel Dunbar, Lewis Pearcey, Talton Cunningham, Needham Means, John Cochran, Edward Roberts, Frank Rowe and John Parham. Holsey Chapel experienced its greatest growth under the leadership of Edward D. Bryson, who was followed by L. P. Napier. Under the leadership of Reverend Allen Page, III, Holsey Chapel remains strong because of effective leadership and dedicated membership.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Holsey Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, 2004.

3. SECONDARY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
 
Location: 1112 29th Street, Columbus, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 19, 2003
SIDE 1: 
Proposed in 1904 by Carleton B. Gibson, Columbus School Superintendent, the Secondary Industrial School is regarded as the nation's first public coeducational industrial high school. G. Gunby Jordan, then President of the School Board, and his son R. C. Jordan donated the land and were instrumental in developing the school. The school was centrally located in Waverly Terrace, a community planned and developed by the Jordan Company, and completed in 1906. The school's name changed to Columbus Industrial High School in 1912 and again in 1939 to Columbus Junior High School.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Historic Columbus Foundation and School Alumni, 2003

SIDE 2:  SECONDARY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
Designed by the Atlanta firm of J. W. Golucke, the building is of monumental style and scale. Using brick and stone to illustrate the Neo-Classical details, this architectural design was popular for public buildings at the turn of the nineteenth century. The building's appearance has remained essentially unchanged since its opening with only minor alterations and an addition of a rear gymnasium in the 1930s. The interior layout is three floors over an English basement, or "Quincy Plan." Golucke was best known for designing twenty courthouses in Georgia. This structure represents one of his few designs that is not a courthouse.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Historic Columbus Foundation and School Alumni, 2003

4. TEMPLE ISRAEL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2005
SIDE 1: 
In 1854 twenty Columbus families banded together to form congregation BNai Israel, later known as Temple Israel, one of the first Jewish congregations in Georgia. For almost one hundred years religious services were held on this site, first in a wooden structure followed by a classical cathedral style edifice reflecting Synagogue architecture of that era. This two story brick Temple, built in 1886 was dedicated September 2, 1887. The last service held in this location was on March 8, 1958. The congregation then moved into a contemporarybuilding on Wildwood Avenue.

This marker is dedicated in memory of Alan Friend Rothschild by his sisters and brothers.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2005

SIDE 2:  TEMPLE ISRAEL
Records exist of Jewish births, marriages, deaths and burials in Columbus following the citys founding in 1828. In 1875, Temple Israel became a founding member of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the reform movements umbrella organization. Temple Israel has continuously functioned as a reform congregation with religious, educational and community outreach programs. The Temples 150th anniversary was celebrated in 2004.

This marker is dedicated in memory of Alan Friend Rothschild by his sisters and brothers.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2005

5. THE ELMS
 
Location: 1846 Buena Vista Road, Columbus, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 20, 2004
SIDE 1: 
In 1844, Lambert Spencer built a simple Greek Revival home detailed with Doric columns and acanthus leaves. In 1868, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bowers enlarged and beautified the home. Mr. Bowers added two hexagonal wings and hired an itinerant painter to paint three ceiling frescoes. Mrs. Bowers, with the help of an English gardener, laid out a formal butterfly-shaped garden. The kitchen was a separate building, joined to the house by a covered porch. Other outbuildings included a two-story servant house, smokehouse, well, wash house, barn and cow shed. The house was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Mrs. Maxwell C. Harden and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2004.

Location: Dedication date: 2-20-2004

SIDE 2:  THE ELMS
Lambert Spencer moved to Columbus from Talbot County, Maryland in 1828. He purchased twelve acres from William L. Wynn in 1844. Henson G. Estes later received the property from Spencer. In 1862, Lloyd Guyton Bowers, a cotton broker, traveled from Massachusetts to Macon, Georgia, where he married Sarah Tabitha Bartlett. The Bowers soon moved to Columbus and purchased The Elms. The house remained in the Bowers family until 1966 and was then purchased by Allen M. Woodall, Jr. In 1999, Mrs. Maxwell C. Harden, daughter of local builder Thomas Watson Cooper, returned to Columbus and purchased The Elms for her home.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Mrs. Maxwell C. Harden and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2004.

Troup County, Georgia»
1. TENTH STREET SCHOOL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  June 22, 2004
Marker Text: 
Constructed in 1931, Tenth Street School provided an education for African-Americans in all grades. Over the years, graduates distinguished themselves in education, law, medicine, religion, government, and military. In 1956, a new school was built for high school students and Tenth Street became an elementary school. In 1970, Tenth Street was integrated to serve all West Point students, grades four through seven. Students were transferred in the mid-1970s to the former Harrison High and the school was demolished. Alumni are forever indebted to the principals and teachers who gave them a start at Tenth Street School.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, The Charter Foundation and Alumni of Tenth Street School, 2004.

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Subsection:   [Main]  [Alabama]  [Georgia]  [Historic Marker Guidelines
Troup County, GA Chambers County, AL Lee County, AL Russell County, AL Barbour County, AL Henry County, AL Dale County, AL Houston County, AL Harris County, GA Muscogee County, GA Chattahoochee County, GA Stewart County, GA Quitman County, GA Randolph County, GA Early County, GA Seminole County, GA Decatur County, GA Clay County, GA