Historic Chattahoochee Commission.
search»  Site Search link. site index»  Site Index link. home»  Link to home page.
HCC graphic. Historic Markers » Georgia HCC graphic.

Click on the county below you wish to view.
Small map of Chattahoochee Trace counties.
Muscogee County, Georgia»
1. COLORED DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY HOSPITAL
 
Location: Corner of 17th Street & 8th Avenue (across from the backside of Linwood Cemetery) Columbus, Georgia.
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  March 9, 2004
SIDE 1: 
The first City Hospital, c. 1841, was located on the South Commons. Called the Pest House, its clients were charity patients. The second City Hospital, c. 1894, was built across from Linwood Cemetery. Architectural details of the Victorian era hospital included a turret, porte-cochere and covered walkways from white and colored wards leading to a brick operating room, to the left of the building. Columbus third hospital was built in 1915, with the Colored Department building located to the rear. The Colored Department was a three-story brick structure completely fitted with the latest and most modern equipment, providing thirty beds.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Alfonso Biggs and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2003.

SIDE 2:  DOCTORS AND NURSES
The service of midwives in early years was vital to the health of Columbus colored patients. The Columbus Colored Medical Association was responsible for the building and maintenance of the Colored Department building in 1915. Dr. W.T. Ayers, Dr. E.J. Turner, Dr. D.W. Gallimore, Dr. M.L. Taylor and Dr. Thomas H. Brewer comprised the board. The Public Health Nurse Association began in 1917. The first colored nurse hired was Sarah V. Allen. Three other colored nurses were soon hired to fulfill the growing need. They were Dagmar Ferell, Mabel Priester and Erlynne Oglen. The four nurses assisted in bedside care and home instruction.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Alfonso Biggs and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2003.

2. HOLSEY CHAPEL CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
 
Location: 718 8th Street, Columbus, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  December 19, 2004
SIDE 1: 
In 1884, a group of black citizens banded together to organize a church. They appealed to the Commissioners of Columbus, Georgia, and obtained a lot on Eighth Street. The first church was completed in 1886 and called Everett Chapel after Newton Everett, one of the original founders and trustees. In 1894, the church was renamed Holsey Chapel, after Bishop Lucius H. Holsey, who played a vital role in the organization of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1915, Holsey Chapel was destroyed by a storm. A new building was completed in 1919, along with a parsonage. The current brick structure was built in 1946.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Holsey Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, 2004.

SIDE 2:  Holsey Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church
In 1888, Reverend P. W. Powell became pastor of Everett Chapel. When Everett Chapel was renamed Holsey Chapel in 1894, Revered C. T. Shatten served the congregation. Revered Loyd McAfee was pastor from 1904 until 1919. Other pastors have included the Reverends Samuel Dunbar, Lewis Pearcey, Talton Cunningham, Needham Means, John Cochran, Edward Roberts, Frank Rowe and John Parham. Holsey Chapel experienced its greatest growth under the leadership of Edward D. Bryson, who was followed by L. P. Napier. Under the leadership of Reverend Allen Page, III, Holsey Chapel remains strong because of effective leadership and dedicated membership.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Holsey Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, 2004.

3. SECONDARY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
 
Location: 1112 29th Street, Columbus, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  May 19, 2003
SIDE 1: 
Proposed in 1904 by Carleton B. Gibson, Columbus School Superintendent, the Secondary Industrial School is regarded as the nation's first public coeducational industrial high school. G. Gunby Jordan, then President of the School Board, and his son R. C. Jordan donated the land and were instrumental in developing the school. The school was centrally located in Waverly Terrace, a community planned and developed by the Jordan Company, and completed in 1906. The school's name changed to Columbus Industrial High School in 1912 and again in 1939 to Columbus Junior High School.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Historic Columbus Foundation and School Alumni, 2003

SIDE 2:  SECONDARY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
Designed by the Atlanta firm of J. W. Golucke, the building is of monumental style and scale. Using brick and stone to illustrate the Neo-Classical details, this architectural design was popular for public buildings at the turn of the nineteenth century. The building's appearance has remained essentially unchanged since its opening with only minor alterations and an addition of a rear gymnasium in the 1930s. The interior layout is three floors over an English basement, or "Quincy Plan." Golucke was best known for designing twenty courthouses in Georgia. This structure represents one of his few designs that is not a courthouse.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, the Historic Columbus Foundation and School Alumni, 2003

4. TEMPLE ISRAEL
 
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  2005
SIDE 1: 
In 1854 twenty Columbus families banded together to form congregation BNai Israel, later known as Temple Israel, one of the first Jewish congregations in Georgia. For almost one hundred years religious services were held on this site, first in a wooden structure followed by a classical cathedral style edifice reflecting Synagogue architecture of that era. This two story brick Temple, built in 1886 was dedicated September 2, 1887. The last service held in this location was on March 8, 1958. The congregation then moved into a contemporarybuilding on Wildwood Avenue.

This marker is dedicated in memory of Alan Friend Rothschild by his sisters and brothers.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2005

SIDE 2:  TEMPLE ISRAEL
Records exist of Jewish births, marriages, deaths and burials in Columbus following the citys founding in 1828. In 1875, Temple Israel became a founding member of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the reform movements umbrella organization. Temple Israel has continuously functioned as a reform congregation with religious, educational and community outreach programs. The Temples 150th anniversary was celebrated in 2004.

This marker is dedicated in memory of Alan Friend Rothschild by his sisters and brothers.

Erected by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission and The Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2005

5. THE ELMS
 
Location: 1846 Buena Vista Road, Columbus, Georgia
Marker Dedication or Erection Date:  February 20, 2004
SIDE 1: 
In 1844, Lambert Spencer built a simple Greek Revival home detailed with Doric columns and acanthus leaves. In 1868, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bowers enlarged and beautified the home. Mr. Bowers added two hexagonal wings and hired an itinerant painter to paint three ceiling frescoes. Mrs. Bowers, with the help of an English gardener, laid out a formal butterfly-shaped garden. The kitchen was a separate building, joined to the house by a covered porch. Other outbuildings included a two-story servant house, smokehouse, well, wash house, barn and cow shed. The house was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Mrs. Maxwell C. Harden and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2004.

Location: Dedication date: 2-20-2004

SIDE 2:  THE ELMS
Lambert Spencer moved to Columbus from Talbot County, Maryland in 1828. He purchased twelve acres from William L. Wynn in 1844. Henson G. Estes later received the property from Spencer. In 1862, Lloyd Guyton Bowers, a cotton broker, traveled from Massachusetts to Macon, Georgia, where he married Sarah Tabitha Bartlett. The Bowers soon moved to Columbus and purchased The Elms. The house remained in the Bowers family until 1966 and was then purchased by Allen M. Woodall, Jr. In 1999, Mrs. Maxwell C. Harden, daughter of local builder Thomas Watson Cooper, returned to Columbus and purchased The Elms for her home.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission, Mrs. Maxwell C. Harden and the Historic Columbus Foundation, Inc., 2004.

 «Tours»   «Calendar»   «Folklife Project»   «Lodging/Food»   «Resources»   «Contact/About»   «Store»   «Home»   «Text Version» 
Subsection:   [Main]  [Alabama]  [Georgia]  [Historic Marker Guidelines
Troup County, GA Chambers County, AL Lee County, AL Russell County, AL Barbour County, AL Henry County, AL Dale County, AL Houston County, AL Harris County, GA Muscogee County, GA Chattahoochee County, GA Stewart County, GA Quitman County, GA Randolph County, GA Early County, GA Seminole County, GA Decatur County, GA Clay County, GA